Labor economy

FILE- In this Dec. 28, 2018, file photo trader Jonathan Corpina, right works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. The U.S. stock market opens at 9:30 a.m. EST on Friday, Feb. 1. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
February 01, 2019 - 4:56 pm
Stocks capped a bumpy day of trading Friday with modest gains, extending the market's winning streak to its third straight day. Gains in technology companies, energy stocks and banks outweighed losses in retailers and elsewhere in the market. Major indexes were higher much of the morning as...
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FILE- In this Jan. 3, 2019, file photo an employment sign hangs from a wooden fence on the property of a McDonald's restaurant in Atlantic Highlands, N.J. On Friday, Feb. 1, the U.S. government issues the January jobs report, which will reveal the latest unemployment rate and number of jobs U.S. employers added. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
February 01, 2019 - 12:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers shrugged off last month's partial shutdown of the government and engaged in a burst of hiring in January, adding 304,000 jobs, the most in nearly a year. The healthy gain the government reported Friday illustrated the job market's durability nearly a decade into the...
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A man holds a smartphone showing stock prices as he monitors stock prices at a brokerage house decorated with red lanterns in Beijing, Friday, Feb. 1, 2019. Asian markets were mixed on Friday as trade talks ended in Washington with no deal but the promise of a second meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese leader Xi Jinping. Gains were limited by a private survey showing that Chinese manufacturing slowed to the lowest level in almost three years. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
February 01, 2019 - 4:03 am
SINGAPORE (AP) — World markets were mostly higher Friday after China-U.S. trade talks ended in Washington with expectations for a second meeting between Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping. But gains were capped by weak manufacturing data for China. KEEPING SCORE: Germany's DAX added 0.2 percent...
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FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2017, file photo a recruiter from the postal service, right, speaks with an attendee of a job fair in the cafeteria of Deer Lakes High School in Cheswick, Pa. U.S. employers likely kept adding jobs at a healthy pace in January even in the face of threats ranging from weakening global growth to the Trump administration's trade war with China to the partial shutdown of the government. On Friday, Feb. 1, 2019, the Labor Department will issue the monthly employment report, the first major economic report to cover most of the 35-day shutdown period that ended a week ago. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)
January 31, 2019 - 5:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers likely kept adding jobs at a healthy pace in January even in the face of threats ranging from weakening global growth to the Trump administration's trade war with China to the partial shutdown of the government. On Friday, the Labor Department will issue the monthly...
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FILE - In this June 28, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump, center, along with Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, left, and Foxconn Chairman Terry Gou participate in a groundbreaking event for the new Foxconn facility in Mt. Pleasant, Wis. Foxconn Technology Group said Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019 it is shifting the focus of its planned $10 billion Wisconsin campus away from blue-collar manufacturing to a research hub, while insisting it remains committed to creating 13,000 jobs as promised. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
January 30, 2019 - 5:38 pm
MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Electronics giant Foxconn reversed course and announced Wednesday that the huge Wisconsin plant that was supposed to bring a bounty of blue-collar factory jobs back to the Midwest — and was lured with billions in tax incentives — will instead be primarily a research and...
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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., accompanied by House Democratic members, listens to a reporters question after signing a deal to reopen the government on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
January 26, 2019 - 12:16 pm
BALTIMORE (AP) — The U.S. economy will likely resume its steady growth now that the government has reopened, though economists say some scars — for the nation and for federal workers — will take time to heal. Most analysts estimate that the 35-day partial shutdown shaved a few tenths of a...
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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., leaves the chamber as President Donald Trump and congressional leaders reached a short-term deal to reopen the government for three weeks, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019. Negotiations will continue over the president's demands for money to build his long-promised wall at the U.S.-Mexico border. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Patrick Gentry
January 25, 2019 - 7:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the partial government shutdown (all times local): 7:50 p.m. President Donald Trump will not be delivering his State of the Union Address next Tuesday, even though the federal government is expected to be reopened by then. Trump had postponed the joint address to...
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FILE - In this June 22, 2018, file photo, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Ross, one of the richest people in President Donald Trump’s Cabinet, is questioning why furloughed federal workers are reluctant to take out loans to get through the government shutdown. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
January 25, 2019 - 4:04 am
NEW YORK (AP) — One White House aide mused that the shutdown was like a paid vacation for some furloughed workers. President Donald Trump's daughter-in-law said employees' "little bit of pain" was worth it for the good of the country. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross questioned why cash-poor workers...
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FILE- In this Jan. 9, 2019, file photo Michael Northern, vice president of WJP Restaurant Group, stands next to an empty table at dinnertime at Rocket City Tavern near numerous federal agencies in Huntsville, Ala. Businesses that count heavily on federal employees as customers are feeling the punishing effects of the government shutdown. Northern said business is down 35 percent. “People are just going home and nesting, trying to conserve resources,” said Northern. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
January 24, 2019 - 6:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — From power restaurants in Washington and a belt-buckle maker in Colorado to a brewery in California, businesses that count heavily on federal employees as customers are feeling the punishing effects of the government shutdown. In many cases, it's forcing them to cut workers' hours...
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FILE- This Aug. 8, 2018, file photo shows electronic menus at McDonald's flagship restaurant in Chicago. Robots aren’t replacing everyone, but a quarter of U.S. jobs will be severely disrupted as artificial intelligence accelerates the automation of today’s work, according to a new Brookings Institution report. The report published Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019, says roughly 36 million Americans hold jobs with “high exposure” to automation, meaning about 70 percent of their work tasks could soon be performed by machines using current technology. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)
Patrick Gentry
January 24, 2019 - 3:23 pm
Robots aren't replacing everyone, but a quarter of U.S. jobs will be severely disrupted as artificial intelligence accelerates the automation of existing work, according to a new Brookings Institution report. Thursday's report from the Washington think tank says roughly 36 million Americans hold...
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