Laws

March 30, 2020 - 9:36 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Idaho Gov. Brad Little on Monday signed into law two anti-transgender bills, making Idaho the first among states that introduced some 40 such bills this year to enact them. The Republican governor approved legislation that prohibits transgender people from changing the sex...
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FILE- This Feb. 22, 2018, file photo shows, a bridge that spans the Apalachee River at Moore's Ford Road where in 1946 two young black couples were stopped by a white mob who dragged them to the riverbank and shot them multiple times in Monroe, Ga. A federal appeals court said Friday, March 27, 2020, that the grand jury records from the 1946 lynching of two black couples in Georgia cannot be released despite their great historical significance. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
March 30, 2020 - 11:44 am
ATLANTA (AP) — The grand jury records from the 1946 lynching of two black couples in Georgia cannot be released despite their great historical significance, a federal appeals court said. The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta ruled 8-4 that federal judges don't have authority to disclose...
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FILE - In this March 23, 2020, file photo, a U.S. National Guard member stands beside crates of medical supplies at the Jacob Javits Center, in New York. The use of National Guard units around the country to help with the response to the coronavirus pandemic is prompting rumors of a national lockdown or even martial law. Guard units are now helping to transport medical supplies, distribute food and even help direct traffic at drive-through testing sites. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
March 25, 2020 - 12:05 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Millions of Americans have been ordered to stay home. Businesses and schools are shuttered. And National Guard units have been activated in more than half the states. Yet despite what you may have read in a text message or on social media, there are currently no plans for a national...
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This 2016, photo shows Margaret Sparrow at her daughter's home in Greytown, New Zealand. Sparrow was delighted Wednesday, March 18, 2020 when New Zealand lawmakers have voted in favor of a landmark bill that treats abortion as a health issue rather than a crime. (Courtesy of Margaret Sparrow via AP)
March 18, 2020 - 4:47 am
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Margaret Sparrow was 21 years old when she drank a concoction to induce an abortion, at a time when the procedure was both illegal and socially unacceptable in New Zealand. Now age 84, Sparrow was delighted Wednesday when lawmakers passed a landmark bill that treats...
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House Speaker Del. Eileen Filler-Corn, D-Fairfax, center, speaks to Sen. Tommy Norment, R-James City County, left, as Del. Luke Torian, D-Prince William, second from left, House minority leader Del Todd Gilbert, R-Shenandoah, and House majority leader, Del. Charniele Herring, D- Alexandria, look on in the entrance to the Senate at the Capitol Saturday March 7, 2020, in Richmond, Va. Both chambers agreed to extending the session to accommodate the budget and conference committee reports. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
March 08, 2020 - 6:26 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Democratic legislators in Virginia have dramatically reshaped the state in two months, sweeping aside many of the state’s old business-friendly and socially conservative laws and replacing them with a broad, progressive policy agenda. Lawmakers wrapped up this year's session...
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Poland's President Andrzej Duda addresses supporters during a ruling Law and Justice party convention that backed his re-election bid in the May 10 presidential vote in Warsaw, Poland, Saturday, Feb. 15, 2020. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
March 07, 2020 - 6:54 am
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Poland's president has signed a bill earmarking nearly 2 billion zlotys ($510 million) to fund public television and radio, broadcast outlets that have become mouthpieces for the country's right-wing government and given the president positive coverage as he campaigns for...
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Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg, right, and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen attend the weekly College of Commissioners meeting at EU headquarters in Brussels, Wednesday, March 4, 2020. European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, who has put climate change at the top of her priorities and pledged to make Europe the first climate neutral continent by 2050, will present her plans on Wednesday. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
March 04, 2020 - 8:51 am
BRUSSELS (AP) — Amid fierce criticism from environmental activists, the European Commission unveiled plans Wednesday for its first ever climate law, which will act as the basis of the European Union's aim to make the 27-country bloc climate neutral by 2050. Under its Green Deal agenda, the EU's...
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European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen rings a bell to signal the start of a weekly College of Commissioners meeting at the EU headquarters in Brussels, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2020. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)
March 03, 2020 - 2:23 pm
BRUSSELS (AP) — Climate activists and Green members of the European Parliament are urging the European Union to be more ambitious as the bloc gets ready to unveil plans for a climate law to cut greenhouse gas emissions to zero by mid-century. While the Greens urged the 27-nation bloc to raise its...
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University of Memphis student Landon Shelby speaks with a reporter outside an off-campus voting location on Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020, in Memphis, Tenn. Shelby, a Republican, said he would like to see the university have a polling location on campus to help students cast ballots more easily. (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz)
March 01, 2020 - 9:47 am
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Vanderbilt University student Will Newell wishes it was easier for college students like him to cast ballots in Tennessee, one of 14 states holding a presidential primary on Super Tuesday. The campus has no locations for early voting, so students must visit an off-campus...
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FILE - In this Jan. 22, 2020, file photo, Night falls on the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court is about to tell President Donald Trump whether he has more power to use a favorite phrase: “You're fired.” A case being argued at the high court Tuesday could threaten the structure of agencies that form an enormous swath of the federal government. It has to do with whether Trump, and future presidents, can fire the heads of independent agencies for any reason. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
March 01, 2020 - 7:49 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is about to tell President Donald Trump whether he has more power to use a favorite phrase: “You're fired.” A case being argued at the high court on Tuesday could threaten the structure of agencies that form an enormous swath of the federal government. It has to...
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