Laws

Former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., right, listens as her husband Mark Kelly, left, speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, about the mass shooting in Las Vegas. Giffords, was a congresswoman when she was shot in an assassination attempt in 2011. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
October 02, 2017 - 9:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The deadly mass shooting in Las Vegas renewed Democrats' calls Monday for gun safety legislation, but their pleas fell on deaf ears in the Republican-controlled Congress. At the same time GOP legislation aimed at loosening gun rules stood in limbo, facing an uncertain future...
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Independence supporters gather in Barcelona's main square, Spain, Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017. Authorities say 844 people and 33 police were injured Sunday in Spanish police raids to halt the independence vote organized by the Catalan autonomous government that was declared ilegal by Spain's constitutional court. (AP Photo/Santi Palacios)
October 01, 2017 - 6:44 pm
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — The Latest on Catalonia's referendum Sunday on breaking away from Spain (all times local): 12:40 a.m. A Catalan official says preliminary results show 90 percent in favor of independence in the vote opposed by Spain. Catalan regional government spokesman Jordi Turull told...
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Karl Kreile, left, and Bodo Mende kiss after their marriage in Berlin, Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017. The couple has become the first in Germany to celebrate a same-sex wedding, after a new law called “marriage for all” came into force Sunday. Karl Kreile, 59, and Bodo Mende, 60, were married Sunday morning at the town hall in Schoeneberg, a Berlin district. The law change followed a free vote in Parliament in June, making Germany the 23rd country worldwide to allow same-sex marriages. (Britta Pedersen/dpa via AP)
October 01, 2017 - 7:11 am
BERLIN (AP) — Germany celebrated its first same-sex weddings Sunday, after a new law came into force putting gay and lesbian couples on an equal legal footing with heterosexual couples. Town halls in Berlin, Hamburg and elsewhere opened their doors to mark the event, made possible by a surprise...
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FILE- This April 4, 2017, file photo, shows the Supreme Court Building in Washington. President Donald Trump’s administration is making some legal about-faces at the Supreme Court and in lower courts. The Trump administration has found itself in court defending a variety of new policies. But it’s also dealing with lawsuits that were in progress before the president took office _ and asserting positions different from those of the Obama administration. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
September 29, 2017 - 7:32 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Backing employers over employees. Backing the state of Ohio over groups involved in voter registration. Backing a narrow reading of a sexual discrimination law over a broad one. Those are just some of the legal about-faces President Donald Trump's administration is making at the...
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September 27, 2017 - 10:12 pm
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — An Australian cookbook author who falsely said she beat cancer through healthy eating has been fined by a court for misleading consumers by lying about her charitable donations. The judge had ruled in March that Belle Gibson's deceptive claims of donating the proceeds...
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FILE - In this July 20, 2017 file photo, former NFL football star O.J. Simpson reacts after learning he was granted parole at Lovelock Correctional Center in Lovelock, Nev. Nevada's parole board says it didn't consider O.J. Simpson's 1989 conviction for misdemeanor spousal abuse when it granted him parole in July because it wasn't listed in the federal clearinghouse of FBI crime data. (Jason Bean/The Reno Gazette-Journal via AP, Pool, File)
September 26, 2017 - 5:26 pm
CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — Nevada's parole board says it didn't consider O.J. Simpson's 1989 conviction for misdemeanor spousal abuse when it granted his release because it wasn't listed in the national clearinghouse of FBI crime data. The disclosure comes as a Nevada lawmaker proposed legislation...
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August 31, 2017 - 7:46 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A U.S. judge is striking down a Utah law that landed a movie theater in trouble for serving alcohol during a showing of superhero film "Deadpool." The ruling Thursday says the state violated Brewvies' freedom of speech when it threatened to fine the theater up to $25,000 under...
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France's Prime Minister Edouard Philippe gives a media conference with Labor Minister Muriel Penicaud in Paris, Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017. France's prime minister says five bold, and divisive, labor reforms are meant to "cure" not "treat the symptoms" of France's high long-standing jobless rate.(AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
August 31, 2017 - 2:40 pm
PARIS (AP) — President Emmanuel Macron's most daring undertaking, reforming France's nearly sacrosanct labor laws, got cheers and jeers as it went public Thursday. It trims union powers, adds a voice for small businesses and creates easier ways to hire and fire workers. The measures meant to foster...
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France's Labor Minister Muriel Penicaud gives a press conference with France's Prime Minister Edouard Philippe, in Paris, Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017. France's prime minister says five bold, and divisive, labor reforms are meant to "cure" not "treat the symptoms" of France's high long-standing jobless rate.(AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
August 31, 2017 - 12:03 pm
PARIS (AP) — The Latest on France's planned labor reforms (all times local): 5:45 p.m. French President Emmanuel Macron's labor reforms, aimed at boosting investment and jobs by doing away with rigid rules, have been criticized from both left and right on the political spectrum. The conservative...
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FILE - In this June 26, 2017, file photo, Lydia Balderas, left, and Merced Leyua, right, join others as they protest against a new sanctuary cities bill outside the federal courthouse in San Antonio. A federal judge late Wednesday, Aug. 30, temporarily blocked most of Texas’ tough new “sanctuary cities” law that would have let police officers ask people during routine stops whether they’re in the U.S. legally and threatened sheriffs will jail time for not cooperating with federal immigration authorities. The law, known as Senate Bill 4, had been cheered by President Donald Trump’s administration and was set to take effect Friday. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
August 31, 2017 - 3:58 am
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A federal judge has temporarily blocked most of Texas' tough new "sanctuary cities" law that would have let police officers ask people during routine stops whether they're in the U.S. legally and threatened sheriffs with jail time for not cooperating with federal immigration...
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