Laws

May 11, 2017 - 1:42 pm
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Legislation closing loopholes in South Carolina's open records law is poised to becoming law, but without a key provision that would have enabled the public to get data from obstinate government agencies without hiring a lawyer. The Senate on Thursday approved a bill designed...
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Fresh off the House vote on repealing Obamacare care, U.S. Rep. Tom MacArthur, right, holds a town meeting in Willingboro, N.J., Wednesday, May 10, 2017. MacArthur, who played a key role in helping the GOP-led U.S. House pass an Affordable Care Act replacement bill faced angry voters at a town hall Wednesday, with charged questions about health care and President Donald Trump. (Tom Gralish/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)
May 11, 2017 - 10:11 am
WILLINGBORO, N.J. (AP) — A Republican who headed the effort to revive the health care overhaul passed by the GOP-led U.S. House faced jeers and insults Wednesday as anger boiled over among voters at a town hall in a heavily Democratic part of his district. Rep. Tom MacArthur faced hundreds of angry...
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FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2017, file photo, Texas Speaker of the House Joe Straus, R-San Antonio, stands before the opening of the 85th Texas Legislative session in the house chambers at the Texas State Capitol in Austin, Texas. State-funded adoption agencies backing Texas legislation that would sanction the rejection of prospective parents on religious grounds already routinely deny non-Christian, gay, and unmarried applicants because they are wary of their beliefs or lifestyle. But now they also want legal cover in case of potential lawsuits. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
May 09, 2017 - 6:07 pm
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Many state-funded Texas adoption agencies routinely deny non-Christian, gay, and unmarried applicants on religious grounds — and now they are backing legislation being considered Tuesday by the state House designed to protect them from potential lawsuits. The private...
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Attorney John Thompson argues for abatement during a hearing before Bristol County Superior Court Judge Susan Garsh Tuesday, May 9, 2017, on a request to vacate the murder conviction of Aaron Hernandez. Judge Garsh ruled Tuesday, that Former NFL star Aaron Hernandez's conviction in a 2013 murder can be erased because he died before his appeal was heard. (Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via AP, Pool)
May 09, 2017 - 2:41 pm
FALL RIVER, Mass. (AP) — The Latest on defense attorneys' efforts to erase Aaron Hernandez's murder conviction following his death (all times local): 2:30 p.m. Prosecutors say they will appeal a ruling erasing former NFL star Aaron Hernandez's conviction in a 2013 murder because he died before his...
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FILE - In this March 15, 2017, file photo, Defendant Aaron Hernandez listens during his double murder trial in Suffolk Superior Court, in Boston. A judge is set to hear arguments in a push by lawyers for former NFL star Aaron Hernandez to erase his conviction in a 2013 murder. The former New England Patriots tight end hanged himself in his prison cell April 19 while serving a life sentence in the killing of semi-professional football player Odin Lloyd. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, Pool, File)
May 09, 2017 - 12:36 pm
FALL RIVER, Mass. (AP) — Former NFL star Aaron Hernandez's conviction in a 2013 murder can be erased because he died before his appeal was heard, a judge ruled Tuesday. Judge E. Susan Garsh said case law in Massachusetts has long established that defendants who have not had the merits of their...
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In this Sunday, May 7, 2017 frame from video posted by the Office of the Governor, Republican Gov. Greg Abbott talks about a so-called "sanctuary cities" ban in Austin Texas. The ban lets police ask during routine stops whether someone is in the U.S. legally and threatens sheriffs with jail if they don't cooperate with federal immigration agents. (Office of Gov. Abbott via AP)
May 08, 2017 - 10:59 pm
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The Mexican government, San Antonio's police chief and others slammed Texas' new "sanctuary cities" law on Monday, saying that requiring local law enforcement to help enforce U.S. immigration law could lead to racial profiling and will fan distrust of the police by the state's...
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In this Sunday, May 7, 2017 frame from video posted by the Office of the Governor, Republican Gov. Greg Abbott talks about a so-called "sanctuary cities" ban in Austin Texas. The ban lets police ask during routine stops whether someone is in the U.S. legally and threatens sheriffs with jail if they don't cooperate with federal immigration agents. (Office of Gov. Abbott via AP)
May 08, 2017 - 4:03 pm
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The Mexican government, San Antonio's police chief and others slammed Texas' new "sanctuary cities" law on Monday, saying that requiring local law enforcement to help enforce U.S. immigration law could lead to racial profiling and will fan distrust of the police by the state's...
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FILE - In this March 24, 2017, file photo, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott talks to reporters outside the White House in Washington. Abbott tweeted the word "Boom" in celebration of the Texas Legislature approving a call for a "convention of states." The idea is for lawmakers in 34 states, representing two-thirds of the nation, to approve convening a gathering to amend the U.S. Constitution and include things like a federal balanced budget amendment to beat back Washington's "overreach." (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
May 08, 2017 - 8:18 am
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas charged to the forefront of the national debate over immigration as Republican Gov. Greg Abbott signed a so-called "sanctuary cities" ban that lets police ask during routine stops whether someone is in the U.S. legally and threatens sheriffs with jail if they don't...
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FILE - In this March 24, 2017, file photo, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott talks to reporters outside the White House in Washington. Abbott tweeted the word "Boom" in celebration of the Texas Legislature approving a call for a "convention of states." The idea is for lawmakers in 34 states, representing two-thirds of the nation, to approve convening a gathering to amend the U.S. Constitution and include things like a federal balanced budget amendment to beat back Washington's "overreach." (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
May 07, 2017 - 10:27 pm
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas pushed to the forefront of national debate over immigration Sunday night when Republican Gov. Greg Abbott signed a so-called "sanctuary cities" ban that lets police ask during routine stops whether someone is in the U.S. legally and threatens sheriffs with jail if they...
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May 06, 2017 - 11:37 pm
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Parents seeking to adopt children in Texas could soon be rejected by state-funded or private agencies with religious objections to them being Jewish, Muslim, gay, single, or interfaith couples, under a proposal in the Republican-controlled Legislature. Five other states have...
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