Legal proceedings

FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2019, file photo, cars pass Purdue Pharma headquarters at night in Stamford, Conn. OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma should not be able to make any more political contributions without a judge's permission, lawyers for its creditors said in a Friday, July 10, 2020 court filing. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
July 11, 2020 - 7:56 pm
OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma should not be able to make any more political contributions without a judge's permission, lawyers for its creditors said in a court filing. The issue came up this week after it was reported that the company, which has a long history of influencing policymakers, made...
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FILE - In this Nov. 7, 2019, file photo, Roger Stone arrives at federal court in Washington. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
July 11, 2020 - 1:36 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has commuted the sentence of his longtime political confidant Roger Stone, intervening in extraordinary fashion in a criminal case that was central to the Russia investigation and that concerned the president's own conduct. The move came Friday, just days...
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FILE - In this Oct. 31 1997 file photo Danny Lee waits for his arraignment hearing for murder in the Pope County Detention Center in Russellville, Ark. A federal judge in Indiana on Friday, July, 10, 2020, halted the first federal execution planned in 17 years scheduled three days from now over COVID-19 concerns. Daniel Lee had been scheduled to die by lethal injection. Lee, 47, of Yukon, Okla., was convicted of the 1996 killings of gun dealer William Mueller, his wife, Nancy, and her 8-year-old daughter, Sarah Powell. (Dan Pierce/The Courier via AP, File)
July 11, 2020 - 1:09 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Determined to proceed with the first federal execution in nearly two decades, the Justice Department plans to appeal a judge’s ruling that would halt authorities from carrying it out on Monday. The family of the victims in the case had requested that it be called off because their...
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Natalia Afonso, 27, an international student from Brazil at Brooklyn College, sits on a stoop outside her home during an interview, Thursday, July 9, 2020, in New York. Afonso, who is studying teaching education and finished her first semester this spring, said she has lived in the U.S. for 7 years and "I don't see myself moving back to Brazil at this point. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
July 11, 2020 - 1:01 am
PHOENIX (AP) — International students worried about a new immigration policy that could potentially cost them their visas say they feel stuck between being unnecessarily exposed during the coronavirus pandemic and being able to finish their studies in America. Students from countries as diverse as...
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Members of the media set up outside the Supreme Court, Thursday, July 9, 2020, in Washington. The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the Manhattan district attorney can obtain Trump tax returns while not allowing Congress to get Trump tax and financial records, for now, returning the case to lower courts. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
July 11, 2020 - 12:17 am
The Supreme Court ruled in two cases involving access to President Donald Trump’s financial records. The cases were the last to be released of the high court’s term, which dragged into July because of the coronavirus pandemic. One case had to do with whether Congress could get access to Trump’s...
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FILE - In this Nov. 7, 2019, file photo, Roger Stone arrives at federal court in Washington. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
July 10, 2020 - 11:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Friday commuted the sentence of his longtime political confidant Roger Stone, intervening in extraordinary fashion in a criminal case that was central to the Russia investigation and that concerned the president's own conduct. The move came just days...
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Workers in protective suits administer coronavirus tests at a COVID-19 testing site for those who were potentially exposed to the coronavirus at a wholesale food market in Beijing, Wednesday, June 17, 2020. As the number of cases of COVID-19 in Beijing climbed in recent days following an outbreak linked to a wholesale food market, officials announced they had identified hundreds of thousands of people who needed to be tested for the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
July 10, 2020 - 10:27 pm
BEIJING — New coronavirus cases have dropped sharply in China, and authorities are turning their attention to concerns that the virus could spread through imported food. Those worries have risen since a June outbreak in Beijing that was linked to the city’s largest wholesale market. Testing has...
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FILE - This March 12, 2019, file photo shows the University Village area of the University of Southern California, in Los Angeles. A California couple has agreed to plead guilty to paying $250,000 to get their daughter into the University of Southern California as a fake volleyball recruit. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)
July 10, 2020 - 8:42 pm
BOSTON (AP) — A California couple agreed Friday to plead guilty to paying $250,000 to get their daughter into the University of Southern California as a fake volleyball recruit. Diane Blake and Todd Blake will plead guilty in front of a judge at a future date, the U.S. Attorney’s office in Boston...
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FILE - Los Angeles Archbishop Jose H. Gomez celebrates the first English Mass with the faithful present, at the nation's largest Catholic Archdiocese in Los Angeles, Sunday, June 7, 2020. A religious freedom law firm with ties to President Donald Trump says it will sue California over its recent ban on singing or chanting in the church to slow the spread of the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)
July 10, 2020 - 6:51 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Crossroads Community Church Senior Pastor Jim Clark wants to keep his 1,500 parishioners safe during the coronavirus pandemic but he's drawing the line at a new California ban on singing or chanting at religious services. “I said enough’s enough,” Clark said. “We will be...
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FILE - In this Nov. 14, 2018 file photo, Dave Haywood, from left, Hillary Scott and Charles Kelley, of Lady A, formerly Lady Antebellum, arrive at the 52nd annual CMA Awards in Nashville, Tenn. The Grammy-winning country group, which dropped the word "Antebellum" from their name because of the word's ties to slavery, has filed a lawsuit against a Black singer who has used the stage name for years. The vocal group filed the lawsuit on Wednesday in federal court in Nashville after negotiations with Anita White broke down in recent weeks. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)
July 10, 2020 - 4:05 pm
Singer Anita White, who was sued by a country group over the use of the name Lady A, says the group is using their white privilege against her. The band, who had previously been known as Lady Antebellum, filed a lawsuit in federal court on Wednesday seeking a ruling that their use of the trademark...
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