Legal proceedings

This Sept. 30, 2015 photo provided by Lambda Legal shows Kimberly Hively at the federal courthouse in Chicago. A federal appeals court ruled for the first time Tuesday, April 4, 2017, that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects LGBT employees from workplace discrimination, setting up a likely battle before the Supreme Court as gay rights advocates push to broaden the scope of the 53-year-old law. The case stems from a lawsuit by Indiana teacher Hively alleging that the Ivy Tech Community College in South Bend didn't hire her full time because she is a lesbian. (Lambda Legal via AP)
April 05, 2017 - 6:57 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — A ruling by a U.S. appeals court in Chicago could reopen the question of whether the 1964 Civil Rights Act's protections apply to LGBT workers in the same way they bar discrimination based on someone's race, religion or national origin. The immediate impact of the 7th Circuit's...
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April 05, 2017 - 6:55 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A once-powerful Mexican drug cartel leader and associate of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman has been sentenced to life in a U.S. prison. Alfredo Beltran Leyva, 46, was sentenced Wednesday after pleading guilty in February to charges his multibillion-dollar operation smuggled tons of...
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In this Tuesday morning, April 5, 2017 photo, from left, Therese Howard, Randy Russell and Jerry Burton speak to reporters before heading into a courtroom in Denver, to stand trial for allegedly violating the city's camping ban. The three defendants are trying to turn the tables on the city by drawing attention to what they think is an immoral law that makes it dangerous for homeless people trying to survive on the street. (AP Photo/Colleen Slevin)
April 05, 2017 - 6:04 pm
DENVER (AP) — Three advocates for Denver's homeless population who tried to camp outside city hall last year were being tried in court Wednesday for violating a city law they consider immoral. They could face up to a year in jail if convicted. Randy Russell, Jerry Burton and Terese Howard set up...
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FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2015 file photo, host Bill O'Reilly of "The O'Reilly Factor" on the Fox News Channel, poses for photos in the set in New York. More advertisers have joined the list of defectors from Fox’s The O’Reilly Factor show bringing the total to around 20. The New York Times had revealed over the weekend that Fox News' parent company had paid settlements totaling $13 million to five women to keep quiet about alleged mistreatment at the hands of Fox's prime-time star. O'Reilly has denied wrongdoing and said he supported the settlements so his family wouldn't be hurt. The news has sparked an exodus of advertisers telling Fox they didn’t want to be involved in O’Reilly’s show. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
April 05, 2017 - 5:25 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The rapid defection of advertisers this week from Bill O'Reilly's show because of sexual harassment allegations raises what once seemed an unthinkable question: Can O'Reilly survive at Fox News Channel? In just the few days since The New York Times reported that Fox News' most...
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Amedeo Dicarlo, lawyer for Karim Baratov, arrives at the courthouse in a chauffeured Rolls Royce in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, on Wednesday, April 5, 2017. Baratov, accused in a massive hack of Yahoo emails said Wednesday he’ll live with his parents and forgo access to phones and any electronic equipment if he’s allowed out on bail. Officials allege that Baratov poses an “extremely high flight risk'' because of his alleged ties to Russian agents. (AP Photo/Robert Gillies)
April 05, 2017 - 2:28 pm
HAMILTON, Ontario (AP) — A Canadian man accused in a massive hack of Yahoo emails said Wednesday he'll live with his parents and forgo access to phones and any electronic equipment if he's allowed out on bail. Officials allege that Karim Baratov poses an "extremely high flight risk" because of his...
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FILE - This combination of undated file photos provided by the Arkansas Department of Correction shows death-row inmates Jason F. McGehee, left, and Kenneth Williams. Both men are scheduled for execution on April 27, 2017. (Arkansas Department of Correction via AP)
April 05, 2017 - 12:15 pm
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas' parole board on Wednesday recommended that Gov. Asa Hutchinson extend mercy to one of eight inmates scheduled to die in an unprecedented series of double-executions this month. Hutchinson is not bound by the board's finding that Jason McGehee's clemency request...
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April 05, 2017 - 10:39 am
HAMILTON, Ontario (AP) — The lawyer for a Canadian man accused in a massive hack of Yahoo emails said Wednesday he has taken steps to ensure his client won't flee if he's released on bail. Officials allege that Baratov poses an "extremely high flight risk" because of his alleged ties to Russian...
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April 05, 2017 - 9:17 am
BOSTON (AP) — A proposed settlement between a Massachusetts man and Dunkin' Donuts shops could mean free buttered baked goods for hundreds of customers and a huge payout for his lawyer. Jan Polanik had sued a cluster of franchises of the Canton, Massachusetts-based doughnut and coffeehouse chain,...
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This Sept. 30, 2015 photo provided by Lambda Legal shows Kimberly Hively at the federal courthouse in Chicago. A federal appeals court ruled for the first time Tuesday, April 4, 2017, that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects LGBT employees from workplace discrimination, setting up a likely battle before the Supreme Court as gay rights advocates push to broaden the scope of the 53-year-old law. The case stems from a lawsuit by Indiana teacher Hively alleging that the Ivy Tech Community College in South Bend didn't hire her full time because she is a lesbian. (Lambda Legal via AP)
April 05, 2017 - 7:40 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Companies cannot discriminate against LGBT employees in the workplace because of their sexual orientation, a federal appeals court said, in a ruling that a gay rights group called a "game changer." The 8-to-3 decision Tuesday by the full 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago...
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April 05, 2017 - 5:30 am
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The state commission charged with fostering an industrial hemp industry in North Carolina is considering joining a lawsuit against a government agency it agrees is making things difficult. The News & Observer of Raleigh reports ( http://bit.ly/2nIRXIN ) the North Carolina...
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