Longevity rates

FILE - In this May 15, 2020, file photo, gravediggers in protective suits carry the coffin of a COVID-19 victim as relatives and friends stand at a distance in the section of a cemetery reserved for coronavirus victims in Kolpino, outside St. Petersburg, Russia. The way Russia counts fatalities during the coronavirus pandemic could be one reason why its official death toll is far below many other countries, even as it has reported at least 511,000 infections, behind only the United States and Brazil. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky, File)
June 14, 2020 - 2:43 am
MOSCOW (AP) — When Leonid Shlykov's father, Sergei, died in a Moscow hospital last month after 11 days on a ventilator, the death certificate listed the coronavirus as an underlying condition but not the actual cause of death. “Yes, he was suffering from impaired kidney function and diabetes, but...
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FILE - In this file photo taken on Sunday, May 10, 2020, Grave diggers wearing personal protective suits carry a coffin while burying a COVID-19 victim in the special purpose for coronavirus victims section of a cemetery in Kolpino, outside St.Petersburg, Russia. The Russian government on Friday May 29, 2020, released updated coronavirus statistics to include deaths of those who tested positive but died of other causes.(AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky, File)
May 29, 2020 - 4:14 pm
MOSCOW (AP) — The Russian government on Friday presented more detailed mortality figures for last month that include more deaths linked with the coronavirus, in a bid to dispel suspicions from some Russian and Western experts that authorities were trying to lower the toll for political reasons. But...
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FILE - This April 2017, file photo provided by NerdWallet shows Liz Weston, a columnist for personal finance website NerdWallet.com. (NerdWallet via AP, File)
June 10, 2019 - 10:35 am
Researchers tell us that most people would be better off waiting to claim Social Security benefits. Yet most people file early. More than half apply for Social Security before they reach full retirement age, which is currently 66 and rising to 67 for people born in 1960 and later. More than 30%...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018 file photo, a bird flies past as smoke emits from the chimneys of Serbia's main coal-fired power station near Kostolac, Serbia. People in all major cities across the Western Balkans face alarming levels of air pollution that are reducing resident’s life expectancies, as the underdeveloped, politically fragile region is still heavily reliant on burning coal to generate electricity and heat, the U.N. Environment Program said in a new report on Monday June 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic, File)
June 03, 2019 - 7:04 am
SARAVEJO, Bosnia (AP) — The U.N. says people in all major cities across the Western Balkans face alarming levels of air pollution that are reducing their life expectancies because the underdeveloped, politically fragile region is still heavily reliant on burning coal to generate power. The report...
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Maggie Hill, 67, watches Charity play in Madison, W.Va., on Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018. Hill adopted the 10-year-old girl about five years ago. Hill's son had been raising her but lost custody during his ongoing struggle with drug addiction, Hill said. (AP Photo/Tyler Evert)
December 18, 2018 - 3:08 am
MADISON, W.Va. (AP) — If you want to understand why U.S. life expectancy is declining, West Virginia is a good place to start. The state is a bellwether of bad health, portending major problems years before they became severe nationally. "It seems that the worst outcomes happen here first," said Dr...
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In this Oct. 22, 2018 file photo, a fentanyl user holds a needle near Kensington and Cambria in Philadelphia. Suicides and drug overdoses helped lead a surge in U.S. deaths last year, and drove a continuing decline in how long Americans are expected to live. U.S. health officials released the latest numbers Thursday, Nov. 29. Death rates for heroin, methadone and prescription opioid painkillers were flat. But deaths from the powerful painkiller fentanyl and its close opioid cousins continued to soar in 2017. (David Maialetti/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP, File)
November 29, 2018 - 12:13 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Suicides and drug overdoses pushed up U.S. deaths last year, and drove a continuing decline in how long Americans are expected to live. Overall, there were more than 2.8 million U.S. deaths in 2017, or nearly 70,000 more than the previous year, the Centers for Disease Control and...
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FILE - In this Aug. 9, 2017 file photo, workers dig a new grave at a church cemetery in New Vienna, Iowa. Preliminary data released on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 shows U.S. death rates rose again last year, indicating that 2017 likely will mark the third straight decline in American life expectancy. (Dave Kettering/Telegraph Herald via AP)
May 23, 2018 - 3:25 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — New government data show U.S. death rates rose last year, suggesting 2017 will mark the third straight year of decline in American life expectancy. Death rates rose for Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, flu and pneumonia, and three other leading causes of death. The Centers for Disease...
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CORRECTS LOCATION TO WHITEHOUSE, NOT SWANTON - This March 2017 photo provided by Heidi Bisbee shows Carly Kudzia, 7, with her mother, Heather Unsinger, in Whitehouse, Ohio. Carly participated in a study suggesting that the drug lonafarnib may extend life for children with progeria, a rare, incurable disease that causes rapid aging. Other kids "always think I'm a baby," Carly says. But "I'm a regular kid." (Heidi Bisbee via AP)
April 24, 2018 - 3:47 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Children with a rare, incurable disease that causes rapid aging and early death may live longer if treated with an experimental drug first developed for cancer patients, a study suggests. The small, preliminary study isn't proof the drug works and it found only a small benefit:...
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In this March 24, 2014 file photo, Jane Delgado, president of the National Alliance for Hispanic Health, works in her office in Washington. U.S. Hispanics have longer life expectancy, but a new poll finds few older Latinos are confident that nursing homes and assisted living facilities can meet their needs. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
August 22, 2017 - 9:33 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Close to one-half of older Hispanics have faced language or cultural barriers interacting with health care providers, and few have confidence in long-term care facilities to meet their needs, according to a poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. And...
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In this March 24, 2014 file photo, Jane Delgado, president of the National Alliance for Hispanic Health, works in her office in Washington. U.S. Hispanics have longer life expectancy, but a new poll finds few older Latinos are confident that nursing homes and assisted living facilities can meet their needs. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
August 22, 2017 - 7:17 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Close to one-half of older Hispanics have faced language or cultural barriers interacting with health care providers, and few have confidence in long-term care facilities to meet their needs, according to a poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. And...
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