Marine dead zones

September 16, 2019 - 2:41 pm
Good afternoon! Here's a look at how AP’s news coverage is shaping up today in the Deep South. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to: The Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org The Columbia AP Bureau at 803-799-5510 or apcolumbia@ap.org The...
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August 01, 2019 - 7:09 pm
Good afternoon! Here's a look at how AP’s news coverage is shaping up today in the Deep South. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to: The Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org The Columbia AP Bureau at 803-799-5510 or apcolumbia@ap.org The...
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Ashley Boudreaux ties sandbags Friday, July 12, 2019, in Baton Rouge, La., ahead of Tropical Storm Barry. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 14, 2019 - 5:03 am
Hurricane Barry could affect the environment of the Gulf coast and Lower Mississippi Valley in numerous ways, from accelerating runoff of farmland nutrients to toppling trees and damaging wildlife habitat and fisheries, scientists say. But the extent of the damage — and whether it will be at least...
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FILE - This file satellite image provided by NASA and taken by U.S. astronaut Christina Koch on Thursday, July 11, 2019 at the International Space Station, shows Tropical Storm Barry as it bears down on Texas, Louisiana, Alabama and the panhandle of Florida as it makes its way through the Gulf of Mexico. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (Christina Koch/NASA via AP, File)
July 13, 2019 - 12:28 am
Tropical Storm Barry could harm the Gulf coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it's hard to predict how severe the damage will be. That's because three distinct factors are coming together at once. The storm is expected to create a surge of up to 3 feet (1 meter) and bring...
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Water flows through Conowingo Dam, a hydroelectric dam spanning the lower Susquehanna River near Conowingo, Md., on Thursday, May 16, 2019. Officials once counted on the dam to block large amounts of sediment in the Susquehanna from reaching Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary, but the reservoir behind the dam has filled with sediment far sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
July 06, 2019 - 9:24 pm
CONOWINGO, Md. (AP) — When the Conowingo Dam opened to fanfare nearly a century ago, the massive wall of concrete and steel began its job of harnessing water power in northern Maryland. It also quietly provided a side benefit: trapping sediment and silt before it could flow miles downstream and...
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June 10, 2019 - 2:42 pm
Good afternoon! Here's a look at how AP's news coverage is shaping up today in the Deep South. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to: The Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org The Columbia AP Bureau at 803-799-5510 or apcolumbia@ap.org The...
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In this image provided by NASA, taken Aug. 3, 2015, phytoplankton is seen off the coast of New York, top and New Jersey, left. A new study projects that global warming’s increased rains will mean more nitrogen flowing into U.S. waterways, which can then trigger more massive blooms of algae, floating green mats, and dead zones with almost no oxygen. This handout NASA satellite photo shows a large bloom of phytoplankton off the New York and New Jersey coast in August 2015. (NASA via AP)
July 27, 2017 - 2:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study projects that increases in rain from global warming could further choke U.S. waterways with fertilizer runoff that trigger dead zones and massive algae blooms. Researchers calculate that if greenhouse gas emissions keep rising, more rain will increase nitrogen flowing...
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