Medical research

March 16, 2019 - 10:01 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A huge study suggests the Apple Watch sometimes can detect a worrisome irregular heartbeat. But experts say more work is needed to tell if using wearable technology to screen for heart problems really helps. More than 419,000 Apple Watch users signed up for the study. An app would...
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FILE - In this May 14, 2008 file photo, cartons of eggs are displayed for sale in the Union Square green market in New York. The latest U.S. research on eggs won’t go over easy for those can’t eat breakfast without them. Study participants who ate about 1 ½ eggs daily had a slightly higher risk of heart disease than those who ate no eggs. The study showed the more eggs, the greater the risk. The chances of dying early were also elevated. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
March 15, 2019 - 7:09 pm
The latest U.S. research on eggs won't go over easy for those who can't eat breakfast without them. Adults who ate about 1 ½ eggs daily had a slightly higher risk of heart disease than those who ate no eggs. The study showed the more eggs, the greater the risk. The chances of dying early were also...
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Ethan Lindenberger testifies during a Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 5, 2019, to examine vaccines, focusing on preventable disease outbreaks. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
March 05, 2019 - 9:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — An Ohio teen defied his mother's anti-vaccine beliefs and started getting his shots when he turned 18 — and told Congress on Tuesday that it's crucial to counter fraudulent claims on social media that scare parents. Ethan Lindenberger of Norwalk, Ohio, said his mother's "love,...
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Timothy Ray Brown poses for a photograph, Monday, March 4, 2019, in Seattle. Brown, also known as the "Berlin patient," was the first person to be cured of HIV infection, more than a decade ago. Now researchers are reporting a second patient has lived 18 months after stopping HIV treatment without sign of the virus following a stem-cell transplant. But such transplants are dangerous, cannot be used widely and have failed in other patients. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)
March 05, 2019 - 4:44 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A London man appears to be free of the virus that causes AIDS after a stem cell transplant, the second success including the "Berlin patient," doctors reported. The therapy had an early success with Timothy Ray Brown, a U.S. man treated in Germany who is 12 years post-transplant and...
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A scientist at the NY Genome Center in New York demonstrates equipment used in single-cell RNA analysis on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018. Until recently, trying to study key traits of cells from people and other animals often meant analyzing bulk samples of tissue, producing an average of results from many cell types. But scientists have developed techniques that let them directly study the DNA codes, and its chemical cousin RNA, the activity of genes and other traits of individual cells. (AP Photo/Malcolm Ritter)
March 04, 2019 - 6:29 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Did you hear what happened when Bill Gates walked into a bar? Everybody there immediately became millionaires — on average. That joke about a very rich man is an old one among statisticians. So why did Peter Smibert use it to explain a revolution in biology? Because it shows...
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FILE - In this Feb. 7, 2018 file photo, a nurse prepares a flu shot at the Salvation Army in Atlanta. Health officials say further research has not found a miscarriage risk for women who get annual flu shots. Two years ago, a puzzling study found women who had miscarriages between 2010 and 2012 were more likely to have had back-to-back annual flu shots. Experts said other factors may have caused the miscarriages, but urged more research. But this week, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials said a larger and more rigorous study found no link over three subsequent flu seasons. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
February 28, 2019 - 2:29 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Health officials say further research has not found a miscarriage risk for women who get annual flu shots. Two years ago, a puzzling study found women who had miscarriages between 2010 and 2012 were more likely to have had back-to-back annual flu shots. So experts urged more...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018, file photo, Zhou Xiaoqin installs a fine glass pipette into a sperm injection microscope in preparation for injecting embryos with Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA at a lab in Shenzhen in southern China's Guandong province. China has unveiled draft regulations on gene-editing and other new biomedical technologies it considers to be "high-risk." The measures follow claims in November 2018 by Chinese scientist He Jiankui that he helped make the world's first genetically-edited babies. That roiled the global science community and elicited widespread outcry over the procedure's ethical implications. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
February 27, 2019 - 1:49 am
BEIJING (AP) — China has unveiled draft regulations on gene editing and other potentially risky biomedical technologies after a Chinese scientist's claim of helping to create gene-edited babies roiled the global science community. Under the proposed measures released Tuesday, technology involving...
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FILE - This Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009 file photo shows toothpaste on a toothbrush in Marysville, Pa. A report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, says too many young kids are using too much toothpaste, increasing their risk of streaky or splotchy teeth when they get older. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
January 31, 2019 - 3:56 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Too many young kids are using too much toothpaste, increasing their risk of streaky or splotchy teeth when they get older, according to a government survey released Thursday. About 40 percent of kids ages 3 to 6 used a brush that was full or half-full of toothpaste, even though...
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FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2014 file photo, a liquid nicotine solution is poured into a vaping device at a store in New York. According to a study released on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, twice as many people successfully quit smoking using electronic cigarettes than older nicotine gums and patches, providing the strongest evidence yet that vaping can help smokers break their addiction to cigarettes. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
January 30, 2019 - 5:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A major new study provides the strongest evidence yet that vaping can help smokers quit cigarettes, with e-cigarettes proving nearly twice as effective as nicotine gums and patches. The British research, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, could influence...
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A pedestrian walk past a building housing the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Providence, R.I. On Tuesday a prominent physicians' group asked the U.S. Department of Agriculture to investigate the school, arguing that it is violating the law by using live pigs for training in emergency medicine. (AP Photo/Jennifer McDermott)
January 30, 2019 - 10:55 am
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — An advocacy group has asked federal regulators to investigate Brown University's medical school, arguing it is violating the law by using live pigs for training in emergency medicine. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine on Tuesday asked the U.S. Department of...
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