Medicare health plans

In this Dec. 5, 2017, photo, Matt Salo, Executive Director of the National Association of Medicaid Directors (NAMD), is photographed in his office in Washington. People on Medicaid are prone to smoke, struggle with depression and obesity, or rate their own health as fair or poor. But a new survey says that’s not the whole story. In theory the networks used by Medicaid insurers could also serve to promote prevention and care coordination, but Salo, cautioned against a cut-and-paste approach that grafts on strategies used by employers. “The Medicaid population is not just an employer population with less income,” said Salo. “It is people who have health conditions.” Salo said he was struck by the high rates of depression in the survey. “Depression is inextricably linked to physical health and the ability to engage effectively in the work force,” he said. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
December 07, 2017 - 1:46 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — It's one of Medicaid's challenges. While low-income people are more likely to struggle with health problems such as smoking and depression, new research shows many are motivated to improve. Thursday's study from the Gallup-Sharecare Well-Being Index found that 40 percent of people...
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November 17, 2017 - 6:40 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Many Medicare beneficiaries will pay higher monthly premiums next year for outpatient coverage, an expense that will eat away at an increase in their Social Security checks, the government announced late Friday afternoon. The news about "Part B" premiums was buried in the fine...
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November 03, 2017 - 10:54 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Legislation providing five more years of financing for an expired children's health program moved near House passage on Friday. But a partisan battle over paying for the extension seems certain to delay the bill in the Senate and has each party accusing the other of jeopardizing a...
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FILE - In this April 5, 2009 file photo, the Department of Health and Human Services building is seen in Washington. A government audit finds that more than 1 in 4 cases of possible sexual and physical abuse against nursing home patients apparently went unreported to police. The Health and Human Services inspector general's office faults Medicare for failing to enforce a federal law that requires nursing homes to immediately notify police. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
August 28, 2017 - 7:25 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 1 in 4 cases of possible sexual and physical abuse against nursing home patients apparently went unreported to police, says a government audit that faults Medicare for failing to enforce a federal law requiring immediate notification. The Health and Human Services...
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FILE - In this April 5, 2009 file photo, the Department of Health and Human Services building is seen in Washington. A government audit finds that more than 1 in 4 cases of possible sexual and physical abuse against nursing home patients apparently went unreported to police. The Health and Human Services inspector general's office faults Medicare for failing to enforce a federal law that requires nursing homes to immediately notify police. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
August 28, 2017 - 6:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 1 in 4 cases of possible sexual and physical abuse against nursing home patients apparently went unreported to police, says a government audit that faults Medicare for failing to enforce a federal law requiring immediate notification. The Health and Human Services...
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FILE - In this April 5, 2009 file photo, the Department of Health and Human Services building is seen in Washington. A government audit finds that more than 1 in 4 cases of possible sexual and physical abuse against nursing home patients apparently went unreported to police. The Health and Human Services inspector general's office faults Medicare for failing to enforce a federal law that requires nursing homes to immediately notify police. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
August 28, 2017 - 3:47 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 1 in 4 cases of possible sexual and physical abuse against nursing home patients apparently went unreported to police, says a government audit that faults Medicare for failing to enforce a federal law requiring immediate notification. The Health and Human Services...
Read More
FILE - In this April 5, 2009 file photo, the Department of Health and Human Services building is seen in Washington. A government audit finds that more than 1 in 4 cases of possible sexual and physical abuse against nursing home patients apparently went unreported to police. The Health and Human Services inspector general's office faults Medicare for failing to enforce a federal law that requires nursing homes to immediately notify police. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
August 28, 2017 - 3:14 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A government audit is faulting Medicare after investigators discovered that more than 1 in 4 cases of possible sexual and physical abuse against nursing home patients apparently went unreported to police. The Health and Human Services inspector general's office says corrective...
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FILE - In this April 5, 2009 file photo, the Department of Health and Human Services building is seen in Washington. A government audit finds that more than 1 in 4 cases of possible sexual and physical abuse against nursing home patients apparently went unreported to police. The Health and Human Services inspector general's office faults Medicare for failing to enforce a federal law that requires nursing homes to immediately notify police. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
August 28, 2017 - 12:33 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 1 in 4 cases of possible sexual and physical abuse against nursing home patients apparently went unreported to police, says a government audit that faults Medicare for failing to enforce a federal law requiring immediate notification. The Health and Human Services...
Read More
August 28, 2017 - 12:01 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A government audit is faulting Medicare after investigators discovered that more than 1 in 4 cases of possible sexual and physical abuse against nursing home patients apparently went unreported to police. The Health and Human Services inspector general's office says corrective...
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In this photo taken July 12, 2017, Cynthia Guzman walks through a garden outside her home in Napa, Calif. Guzman underwent a special kind of PET scan that can detect a hallmark of Alzheimer’s and learned she didn’t have that disease as doctors originally thought, but a different form of dementia. New research suggests those scans may lead to changes in care for people with memory problems that are hard to diagnose. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
July 19, 2017 - 3:40 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Does it really take an expensive brain scan to diagnose Alzheimer's? Not everybody needs one but new research suggests that for a surprising number of patients whose memory problems are hard to pin down, PET scans may lead to changes in treatment. The findings, reported Wednesday...
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