Medication

FILE - In this Thursday, July 21, 2016 file photo, residents of the Kisenso district receive yellow fever vaccines, in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. The World Health Organization says that about 11 percent of medicines in developing countries are fake _ and potentially responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of children from diseases like malaria and pneumonia. In the U.N. health agency’s first attempt to assess the problem, experts reviewed 100 papers, involving more than 48,000 medicines. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)
November 28, 2017 - 10:58 am
LONDON (AP) — About 11 percent of medicines in developing countries are counterfeit and likely responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of children from diseases like malaria and pneumonia every year, the World Health Organization said Tuesday. It's the first attempt by the U.N. health...
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In this Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017, photo, Brad Sippy, chief executive officer of Tremeau Pharmaceuticals, Inc., stands for a portrait in Cambridge, Mass. Tremeau Pharmaceuticals, Inc., is a small startup trying to bring the recalled painkiller Vioxx back to the market. They are seeking FDA approval for patients with hemophilia with severe pain, but once on the market, doctors could go back to prescribing it to anyone with pain. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
November 21, 2017 - 6:12 am
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Could there be a second life for the once-popular arthritis pill Vioxx? A startup pharmaceutical company hopes so. Merck & Co. voluntarily pulled the blockbuster drug in 2004 amid evidence that it doubled the chances of having a heart attack or stroke. Now tiny Tremeau...
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November 16, 2017 - 3:21 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health authorities announced plans Thursday to crack down on doctors pushing stem cell procedures that pose the gravest risks to patients amid an effort to police a burgeoning medical field that previously has received little oversight. The Food and Drug Administration laid...
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This Aug. 17, 2017 photo provided by the Burke County Sheriff's Office in Bowbells, N.D. shows Melissa Etheridge. Etheridge a Grammy-winning rock singer has pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of possessing marijuana in North Dakota. An attorney for the California musician entered the plea on her behalf Tuesday Nov. 14. Under a proposed order, Etheridge would pay a fine of $750 and serve unsupervised probation. (Burke County Sheriff's Office via AP)
November 16, 2017 - 2:04 pm
BOWBELLS, N.D. (AP) — Grammy-winning rock singer Melissa Etheridge has pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of possessing marijuana in North Dakota. KMOT-TV reports an attorney for the California musician entered the plea on her behalf Tuesday. Under a proposed order, Etheridge would pay a fine...
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This photo provided by Genentech, Inc. shows a package of the drug Hemlibra. On Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017, the Food and Drug Administration approved Hemlibra, the first new treatment in nearly two decades to prevent internal bleeding in certain patients with hemophilia, an inherited blood-clotting disorder. (Genentech, Inc. via AP)
November 16, 2017 - 1:29 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — U.S. regulators have approved the first new treatment in nearly two decades to prevent internal bleeding in certain patients with hemophilia, an inherited blood-clotting disorder. The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved Hemlibra (hem-LEE'-bruh), a weekly injection...
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FILE - In this July 31, 2014, file photo, gay rights campaigners act out electric shock treatment to protest outside a court where the first court case in China involving so-called conversion therapy is held in Beijing, China. Human Rights Watch says Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017, in a new report that the Chinese government should stop hospitals and other medical facilities from subjecting LGBT people in China to conversion therapy that in some cases has involved electroshocks, involuntary confinement and forced medication. The banners from left read "Gays, no need to be treated," "Support Haidian Court, Against twisted treatment," and "Ms. Baidu promotes gay treatment by Li Yanhong (Chairman of Baidu)." (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
November 15, 2017 - 2:22 am
HONG KONG (AP) — The Chinese government should stop hospitals and other medical facilities from subjecting LGBT people to conversion therapy that in some cases has involved electroshock, involuntary confinement and forced medication, a human rights group said Wednesday. The report released by New...
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FILE - This Oct. 14, 2015, file photo, shows the U.S. Food & Drug Administration campus in Silver Spring, Md. On Monday, Nov. 13, 2017, the FDA approved the first drug in the United States with a digital ingestion tracking system, in an unprecedented move to ensure that patients with mental illness take the medicine prescribed for them. The drug Abilify MyCite was developed by Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
November 14, 2017 - 12:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. regulators have approved the first drug with a sensor that alerts doctors when the medication has been taken, offering a new way of monitoring patients but also raising privacy concerns. The digital pill approved Monday combines two existing products: the former blockbuster...
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FILE - In this June 6, 2013, file photo, a patient has her blood pressure checked by a registered nurse in Plainfield, Vt. New medical guidelines announced Monday, Nov. 13, 2017, lower the threshold for high blood pressure, adding 30 million Americans to those who have the condition. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)
November 13, 2017 - 9:09 pm
ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — New guidelines lower the threshold for high blood pressure, adding 30 million Americans to those who have the condition, which now plagues nearly half of U.S. adults. High pressure, which for decades has been a top reading of at least 140 or a bottom one of 90, drops to 130...
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FILE - In this April 25, 2014, file photo, a sign points the way to a hospital in Georgia. A study shows that Medicare patients with common illnesses who were treated by their own familiar primary care doctors were slightly more likely to survive after being sent home than those treated by hospitalists, internists who don't provide care outside of hospitals. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
November 13, 2017 - 1:28 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The old-fashioned, family doctor style of medicine could be lifesaving for elderly hospitalized patients, a big study suggests, showing benefits over a rapidly expanding alternative that has hospital-based doctors overseeing care instead. Medicare patients with common conditions...
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FILE - In this June 8, 2006 file photo, then Deputy Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar meets reporters at the HHS Department in Washington. Azar was a top HHS official during the George W. Bush administration. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
November 13, 2017 - 12:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Turning to an industry he's rebuked, President Donald Trump on Monday picked a former top pharmaceutical and government executive to be his health and human services secretary, overseeing a $1 trillion department responsible for major health insurance programs, medical research,...
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