Military facilities

FILE - In this June 17, 2020, file photo, Turkey's Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu, left, and Muhammed Tahir Siyala, Foreign Minister of Libya's internationally-recognized government, speak at the airport, in Tripoli, Libya. Libya’s eastern-based forces have lost the chance to engage in a political solution to the North African country’s conflict, Turkey's foreign minister said Saturday, June 20, 2020. (Fatih Aktas/Turkish Foreign Ministry via AP, Pool, File)
June 20, 2020 - 12:27 pm
CAIRO (AP) — Egypt’s president Saturday warned that an attempt by Turkey-backed forces in Libya to attack the strategic city of Sirte would cross a “red line" and trigger a direct Egyptian military intervention into the conflict. Abdel Fattah el-Sissi, in televised comments, said Egypt could...
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This Jan. 4, 2020 file photo shows a sign for at Fort Bragg, N.C. As much as President Donald Trump enjoys talking about winning and winners, the Confederate generals he vows will not have their names removed from U.S. military bases were not only on the losing side of rebellion against the United States, some weren't even considered good generals. Or even good men. The 10 generals include some who made costly battlefield blunders; others mistreated captured Union soldiers, some were slaveholders, and one was linked to the Ku Klux Klan after the war. (AP Photo/Chris Seward, File)
June 16, 2020 - 7:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell said Tuesday he’s “OK” with renaming military bases such as Fort Bragg that are named after Confederate Army officers, declining to side with President Donald Trump and other Republicans opposed to the move. The Kentucky senator said he'll...
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President Donald Trump listens during a roundtable about America's seniors, in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Monday, June 15, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
June 15, 2020 - 8:55 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Monday he is ordering a major reduction in U.S. troop strength in Germany, a move widely criticized by members of his own party as a gift to Russia and a threat to U.S. national security. “We're putting the number down to 25,000 soldiers,” Trump said at...
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June 15, 2020 - 8:05 am
LONDON (AP) — A U.S. Air Force fighter plane with one pilot on board crashed into the North Sea on Monday. The status of the pilot wasn't known. The F-15C Eagle from the 48th Fighter Wing was on a routine training mission from RAF Lakenheath when it crashed at 9:40 a.m. The cause of the crash wasn'...
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This Nov. 5, 2009 file photo shows the entrance to Fort Hood Army Base in Fort Hood, Texas, near Killeen, Texas. As much as President Donald Trump enjoys talking about winning and winners, the Confederate generals he vows will not have their names removed from U.S. military bases were not only on the losing side of rebellion against the United States, some weren't even considered good generals. Or even good men. The 10 generals include some who made costly battlefield blunders; others mistreated captured Union soldiers, some were slaveholders, and one was linked to the Ku Klux Klan after the war. (AP Photo/Jack Plunkett, File)
June 14, 2020 - 8:53 am
CINCINNATI (AP) — As much as President Donald Trump enjoys talking about winning and winners, the Confederate generals he vows will not have their names removed from U.S. military bases were not only on the losing side of rebellion against the United States, some weren’t even considered good...
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People stand around the fallen Christopher Columbus statue at the Minnesota state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., Wednesday, June 10, 2020. (Evan Frost/Minnesota Public Radio via AP)
June 12, 2020 - 12:34 am
The rapidly unfolding movement to pull down Confederate monuments around the U.S. in the wake of George Floyd’s death at the hands of police has extended to statues of slave traders, imperialists, conquerors and explorers around the world, including Christopher Columbus, Cecil Rhodes and Belgium’s...
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Mike Forcia raises his hands in the air as people photograph the fallen Christopher Columbus statue at the Minnesota state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., Wednesday, June 10, 2020. (Evan Frost/Minnesota Public Radio via AP)
June 11, 2020 - 10:17 pm
The rapidly unfolding movement to pull down Confederate monuments around the U.S. in the wake of George Floyd’s death has extended to statues of slave traders, imperialists, conquerors and explorers around the world, including Christopher Columbus, Cecil Rhodes and Belgium’s King Leopold II...
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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 11, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
June 11, 2020 - 3:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday that it's time to remove symbols honoring Confederate figures from the U.S. Capitol building and military bases as the pandemic and racial unrest force a national reckoning with racial discrimination. "These names have to go from these...
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FILE - In this Jan. 4, 2020, file photo a sign for at Fort Bragg, N.C., is shown. Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy, both former Army officers, put out word that they are “open to a bipartisan discussion” of renaming Army bases like North Carolina’s Fort Bragg that honor Confederate officers associated by some with the racism of that tumultuous time. (AP Photo/Chris Seward, File)
June 10, 2020 - 3:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday said his administration will “not even consider” changing the name of any of the 10 Army bases that are named for Confederate Army officers. Two days earlier, Defense Secretary Mark Esper indicated that he was open to a broad discussion of such...
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FILE - In this Jan. 4, 2020, file photo a sign for at Fort Bragg, N.C., is shown. Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy, both former Army officers, put out word that they are “open to a bipartisan discussion” of renaming Army bases like North Carolina’s Fort Bragg that honor Confederate officers associated by some with the racism of that tumultuous time. (AP Photo/Chris Seward, File)
June 09, 2020 - 5:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. military is rethinking its traditional connection to Confederate Army symbols, mindful of their divisiveness at a time the nation is wrestling with questions of race after the death of George Floyd in police hands. Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Army Secretary Ryan...
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