Mormonism

In this May 27, 2020, photo, from Seth Rather, a missionary with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, looks at his smartphone at his apartment, in Brigham City, Utah. After hastily bringing home 26,000 young men and women who were serving in foreign countries, the faith has begun sending many of them out again in their home countries with a new focus on online work that could stick even when the pandemic is over, church officials told The Associated Press. For safety reasons missionaries are now inside and on their smartphones most of the day trying to find new converts or bolster the faith of current church members. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
June 05, 2020 - 12:53 pm
BRIGHAM CITY, Utah (AP) — Wearing dress shirts, ties and name tags, three missionaries with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints sit around the kitchen table inside a Utah apartment planning how they'll spread their gospel that day. Seth Rather, a 19-year-old from Wichita, Kansas, reads...
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In this photograph provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints shows, far left to right, Neil L. Andersen, M. Russell Ballard, both members of a top governing board called the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, sit next to each other during The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints' twice-annual church conference Saturday, April 4, 2020, in Salt Lake City. The conference kicked off Saturday without anyone attending in person and top leaders sitting some 6 feet apart inside an empty room as the faith takes precautions to avoid the spread of the coronavirus. A livestream of the conference showed a few of the faith's top leaders sitting alone inside a small auditorium in Salt Lake City, Normally, top leaders sit side-by-side on stage with the religion's well-known choir behind them and some 20,000 people watching. (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints via AP)
April 04, 2020 - 10:42 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Leaders from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints sat 6 feet apart inside an empty room as the faith carried out its signature conference Saturday by adhering to social distancing guidelines that offered a stark reminder of how the global coronavirus pandemic is...
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FILE - In this Oct. 5, 2019, file photo, President Russell M. Nelson speaks during The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints' twice-annual church conference, in Salt Lake City. For the first time in more than 60 years, top leaders from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints will deliver speeches at the faith's signature conference this weekend without anyone watching in the latest illustration of how the coronavirus pandemic is altering worship practices around the world. The twice-yearly conference normally brings some 100,000 people to the church conference center in Salt Lake City to watch five sessions over two days. This event, though, will be only a virtual one. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
April 03, 2020 - 2:43 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — For the first time in more than 70 years, top leaders from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints will deliver speeches at the faith's signature conference this weekend without an in-person audience in the latest illustration of how the coronavirus pandemic is...
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In this Sunday, March 22, 2020 photo, hundreds of people gather to welcome missionaries returning home from the Philippines at the Salt Lake City International Airport. Sen. Mitt Romney and Utah state leaders are criticizing the large gathering of family and friends who went to the airport when people are supposed to be keeping their distance from one another to prevent more spread of the coronavirus. (Rick Egan/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP)
March 23, 2020 - 5:41 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — U.S. Sen. Mitt Romney and Utah state leaders on Monday criticized as irresponsible a weekend gathering of hundreds of people at a Salt Lake City airport parking garage to welcome home 900 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints missionaries returning from the Philippines...
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Construction workers looks at the rubble from a building after an earthquake Wednesday, March 18, 2020, in Salt Lake City. A 5.7-magnitude earthquake has shaken the city and many of its suburbs. The quake sent panicked residents running to the streets, knocked out power to tens of thousands of homes and closed the city's airport and its light rail system.  (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
March 18, 2020 - 5:29 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A moderate earthquake Wednesday near Salt Lake City temporarily shut down a major air traffic hub, damaged a spire atop a temple and frightened millions of people already on edge from the coronavirus pandemic. There were no reports of injuries. The 5.7-magnitude quake just...
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In this Feb. 28, 2020 file photo, Mayor David Depretis of Baldwin Borough brings in the sign announcing "Fish Fry Today," after Holy Angels parish sold out of fish in Pittsburgh, Pa. The parish church prepares 2,000 pounds of fish and often sells out early, according to organizer Cindy Depretis, who is married to the mayor. On March 12, Pittsburgh Bishop David Zubik suggested that people enjoy the fish fries with a take-out order rather than dining in due to virus concerns. (AP Photo/Rebecca Droke)
March 13, 2020 - 7:27 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Across the United States, religious leaders are taking unprecedented steps to shield their congregations from the coronavirus - canceling services, banning large funerals and weddings, and waiving age-old requirements of their faiths. For Roman Catholics, attendance at Mass is...
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March 06, 2020 - 7:59 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — After Brigham Young University two weeks ago dropped a section from its strict code of conduct that had prohibited all expressions of homosexual behavior, bisexual music major Caroline McKenzie felt newfound hope that she could stop hiding and be herself. She even went on a...
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FILE - In this April 12, 2019, file photo, Sidney Draughon holds a sign as she takes part in a protest in Provo, Utah, against how the Brigham Young University Honor Code Office investigates and disciplines students. Brigham Young University in Utah has revised its strict code of conduct to strip a rule that banned any behavior that reflected "homosexual feelings," which LGBTQ students and their allies felt created an unfair double standard not imposed on heterosexual couples. The college is owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which teaches its members that being gay isn't a sin, but engaging in same-sex intimacy is. BYU's revisions to what the college calls its "honor code" don't change the faith's opposition to same-sex relationships or gay marriage. The changes were discovered by media outlets Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2020. (Rick Egan/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
March 04, 2020 - 4:53 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Brigham Young University in Utah reiterated Wednesday that “same-sex romantic behavior” is not allowed on campus — dashing the hopes of LGTBTQ students who thought they could be more open after the college previously revised its code of conduct. The university owned by The...
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FILE - This Oct. 4, 2019, file photo, shows the Salt Lake Temple at Temple Square in Salt Lake City. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has postponed a key meeting of top global leaders scheduled for April 1-2 because of the spread of the coronavirus around the world. The faith is also discouraging members from traveling from outside the United States for a twice-yearly conference set for the weekend of April 4-5 in Salt Lake City, the religion said in a news release Thursday, Feb. 27, 2020. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
February 27, 2020 - 7:10 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints announced Thursday that it has postponed a key April meeting of its top global leaders because of the spread of the coronavirus, and said it is discouraging its many members who live outside the U.S. from coming to Utah for much...
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FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2020, file photo, Republican Rep. Brady Brammer, poses for a portrait at the Utah State Capitol in Salt Lake City. A proposal to require warning labels on pornography in Utah passed the state House on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2020, a move an adult-entertainment industry group called a dark day for freedom of expression. Brammer, the lawmaker behind the plan to mandate the labels about potential harm to minors, says it’s aimed at catching the “worst of the worst.”(AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
February 18, 2020 - 7:55 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Utah lawmakers voted Tuesday to put new regulations on pornography and remove some on polygamy in separate proposals moving quickly through the Legislature in the deeply conservative state. Senators voted unanimously to change state law to remove the threat of jail time for...
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