Native Americans

In this Feb. 21, 2019, photo, a snow-encrusted sign marks the entrance to the police station located on a tundra road on the outskirts of Nome, Alaska. An internal cold case audit launched in 2019 has uncovered evidence that the agency regularly failed to fully investigate sexual assaults. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)
December 19, 2019 - 4:29 pm
NOME, Alaska (AP) — The two cops — the cold case detective from Virginia and the evidence technician from Alaska — had a mission. Sift through more than a decade of grim stories from this small city set between the Bering Strait and Alaska’s western tundra. Nome’s new police chief, another Virginia...
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In this Nov. 18, 2019, photo, Sportsbook shift manager Stuart Norsell, right, assists a patron, left, in the sports betting area of Twin River Casino in Lincoln, R.I. Legalized sports betting's rapid march across the U.S. could face some bigger tests in 2020. Less than two years after a U.S. Supreme Court ruling opened the door to sportsbooks outside Nevada, they have been legalized in states that are home to about one-third of the nation's population. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
December 18, 2019 - 3:19 pm
LINCOLN, R.I. (AP) — The line for the ticket windows at a Rhode Island casino's sportsbook stretched to the door on one afternoon last month: Gamblers were cashing in their winnings from betting on the victorious New England Patriots the day before and placing new wagers for that night. “This...
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This undated image provided by the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico shows a sandal (Catalogue No. 2009.46.1) excavated decades ago from the Guadalupe Mountains. Researchers will be taking a new look at numerous perishable artifacts that include sandals and baskets to learn more about the people who once inhabited the region. (Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, The University of New Mexico via AP)
December 02, 2019 - 6:10 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Sandals and baskets that have withstood the ravages of time will be among the perishable artifacts analyzed by a team of scientists looking to learn more about a corner of the southwestern United States that was first excavated decades ago. Depending on what they uncover,...
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This Oct. 8, 2019 photo provided by Shane Balkowitsch shows climate activist Greta Thunberg visiting the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in Fort Yates, N.D. Thunberg accepted the photographer's request to pose for the photo using an old technique that involves wetting glass plates with various chemicals before making an exposure. The resulting photographs are being archived at the Library of Congress in Washington and the Swedish History Museum in Stockholm. (Shane Balkowitsch via AP)
December 02, 2019 - 4:07 pm
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — A photo of Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg at a Native American reservation in North Dakota has been archived at the Library of Congress in Washington. Photographer Shane Balkowitsch preserved the image on a glass plate and titled it “Standing For Us All.” The method...
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FILE - In a Monday, Aug. 28, 2017 file photo, a makeshift memorial to Savanna Greywind featuring a painting, flowers, candle and a stuffed animal is seen on Monday, Aug. 28, 2017, in Fargo, N.D., outside the apartment where Greywind lived with her parents. Republican U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski from Alaska is taking up the cause for a bill aimed at helping law enforcement with cases of murdered and missing indigenous women. Former North Dakota Democratic Sen. Heidi Heitkamp introduced and helped pass Savanna's Act in the Senate before she lost election, but it was blocked in the House by a retiring Republican. (AP Photo/Dave Kolpack, File)
November 29, 2019 - 10:08 pm
FARGO, N.D. (AP) — A bill originally meant to help law enforcement investigate cold cases of murdered and missing indigenous women that has floundered in Congress for two years may have the missing ingredients to become law — money and muscle. The money comes from an appropriations subcommittee...
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President Donald Trump shows an executive order establishing the Task Force on Missing and Murdered American Indians and Alaska Natives, in the Oval Office of the White House, Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
November 26, 2019 - 5:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump signed an executive order Tuesday creating a White House task force on missing and slain American Indians and Alaska Natives. The task force will be overseen by Attorney General William Barr and Interior Secretary David Bernhardt. It will develop protocols...
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Attorney General William Barr, center, shakes hands with Vernon Finley, left, and Tony Incashola, right, after they presented him with a blanket during a Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes council meeting, Friday, Nov. 22, 2019, on the Flathead Reservation in Pablo, Mont. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
November 22, 2019 - 5:43 pm
PABLO, Mont. (AP) — Attorney General William Barr announced a nationwide plan Friday to address the crisis of missing and slain Native American women as concerns mount over the level of violence they face. Barr announced the plan, known as the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Persons Initiative,...
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Eloy Martinez, who took part in the Native American occupation, raises a fist while making his way to ceremonies marking the 50th anniversary of the occupation on Alcatraz Island, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019, in San Francisco. About 150 people gathered at Alcatraz to mark the 50th anniversary of a takeover of the island by Native American activists. Original occupiers, friends, family and others assembled Wednesday morning for a program that included prayer, songs and speakers. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
November 20, 2019 - 9:12 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — For Eloy Martinez, returning to Alcatraz Island meant a joyous reunion with people he hadn’t seen in decades. It also brought a renewed sense of hope and pride. Martinez was among about 150 people who took windy boat rides to the island Wednesday for the first of three days of...
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FILE - In this March 21, 2019 file photo, Acoma Pueblo Gov. Brian Vallo poses outside the Pueblo's cultural center about 60 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico. A ceremonial shield at the center of a yearslong international debate over exporting of sacred Native American objects to foreign markets has returned to New Mexico. U.S. and Acoma Pueblo officials planned Monday, Nov. 18 to announce the shield’s return from Paris, where it had been listed for bidding in 2016 before the EVE auction house took the rare step of halting its sale. “It will be a day of high emotion and thanksgiving,” Vallo said ahead of the shield’s expected return to his tribe. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca, File)
November 18, 2019 - 8:02 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A ceremonial Native American shield has been welcomed back to New Mexico by tribal leaders, in the culmination of a yearslong international campaign to reclaim the sacred object that held a place in a cycle of ceremonies until it vanished from a mesa-top indigenous village...
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FILE - This Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019 image made available by NASA shows the Kuiper belt object originally called "Ultima Thule," about 1 billion miles beyond Pluto, encountered by the New Horizons spacecraft. On Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, NASA announced its official name "Arrokoth" which means "sky" in the language of the Native American Powhatan people.(NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute via AP, File)
November 12, 2019 - 9:11 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The most distant world ever explored 4 billion miles away finally has an official name: Arrokoth. That means "sky" in the language of the Native American Powhatan people, NASA said Tuesday. NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the snowman-shaped Arrokoth on New Year'...
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