Neurological disorders

December 13, 2018 - 6:00 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Four former employees and an owner of the Massachusetts facility responsible for a nationwide fungal meningitis outbreak that has killed more than 100 people and sickened hundreds were convicted Thursday of fraud and other offenses. A Boston jury acquitted another employee, pharmacist...
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FILE - This 2014 file electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows numerous, spheroid-shaped Enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) virions. Doctors have suspected a mysterious paralyzing illness, acute flaccid myelitis, might be tied to the virus. This year has seen a record number of cases of the mysterious paralyzing illness in children, U.S. health officials said Monday, Dec. 10, 2018. (Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Yiting Zhang/CDC via AP, File)
December 10, 2018 - 3:41 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — This year has seen a record number of cases of a mysterious paralyzing illness in children, U.S. health officials said Monday. It's still not clear what's causing the kids to lose the ability to move their face, neck, back, arms or legs. The symptoms tend to occur about a week after...
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FILE - In this Jan. 31, 2015 file photo, SpongeBob SquarePants creator Stephen Hillenburg attends the world premiere of "The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge Out Of Water" in New York. Hillenburg died Monday, Nov. 26, 2018 of ALS. He was 57. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)
November 27, 2018 - 3:00 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Stephen Hillenburg, who used his dual loves of drawing and marine biology to spawn the absurd undersea world of "SpongeBob SquarePants," has died, Nickelodeon announced Tuesday. Hillenburg died Monday of Lou Gehrig's disease, also known as ALS, the cable network said in a...
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November 13, 2018 - 1:09 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — More children have been diagnosed with a mysterious paralyzing illness, and U.S. health officials still aren't sure what's causing it. Officials say this year's count could surpass the numbers seen in similar outbreaks in 2014 and 2016. Fortunately, the disease remains rare: This...
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FILE - In this Sept. 17, 2014 file photo, retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor speaks during a lecture, in Concord, N.H. O'Connor, the first woman on the Supreme Court, says she has the beginning stages of dementia and "probably Alzheimer's disease." O'Connor made the announcement in a letter Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. She said that her diagnosis was made "some time ago" and that as her condition has progressed she is "no longer able to participate in public life." (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)
October 23, 2018 - 1:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sandra Day O'Connor, the first woman on the Supreme Court, announced Tuesday in a frank and personal letter that she has been diagnosed with "the beginning stages of dementia, probably Alzheimer's disease." The 88-year-old said doctors diagnosed her some time ago and that as her...
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October 16, 2018 - 3:54 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. health officials on Tuesday reported a jump in cases of a rare paralyzing illness in children, and said it seems to be following an every-other-year pattern. At least 62 cases have been confirmed in 22 states this year, and at least 65 additional illnesses in those states are...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Alabama Department of Corrections shows inmate Vernon Madison. The U.S. Supreme Court will consider the case of Madison who lawyers say suffers from dementia and can no longer remember killing a police officer in 1985. Justices will hear arguments Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018, on whether it would be unconstitutional to execute 68-year-old Madison who was convicted of killing Mobile police officer Julius Schulte in 1985. The U.S. Supreme Court has said death row prisoners have "rational understanding" that they are about to be executed and why. (Alabama Department of Corrections, via AP, File)
October 02, 2018 - 3:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court appeared willing Tuesday to extend protection from capital punishment to people with dementia who can't recall their crime or understand the circumstances of their execution. The eight justices heard arguments in the case of Alabama death row inmate Vernon...
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Principal Scientist Jessica Langbaum, right, and her mother, Ivy Segal, 67, go over procedures for Segal's gene testing Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018 at Banner Alzheimers Institute in Phoenix. Banner is conducting two studies that target the very earliest brain changes while memory and thinking skills are still intact in hope of preventing the disease. (AP Photo/Matt York)
October 02, 2018 - 12:29 am
PHOENIX (AP) — Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, and scientists so far have been unable to find a treatment to stop its progression in people who already have some mental decline. So two large studies are starting much earlier, trying to prevent the disease by targeting the...
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September 22, 2018 - 4:56 pm
SANTA ROSA, Calif. (AP) — A California kindergartner can keep bringing a cannabis-based drug used for emergency treatment of a rare form of epilepsy to her public school, a judge ruled Friday. The Santa Rosa Press-Democrat reported that a judge sided with the family of 5-year-old Brooke Adams. The...
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FILE - In this March 21, 2006 file photo, pills move through a precision weighing machine at a pharmaceutical manufacturers trade show in New York. A federal watchdog agency says thousands of foster children may be getting powerful psychiatric drugs prescribed to them without required safeguards. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
September 17, 2018 - 2:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands of foster children may be getting powerful psychiatric drugs prescribed to them without basic safeguards, says a federal watchdog agency that found a failure to care for youngsters whose lives have already been disrupted. A report released Monday by the Health and Human...
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