Neurological disorders

Principal Scientist Jessica Langbaum, right, and her mother, Ivy Segal, 67, go over procedures for Segal's gene testing Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018 at Banner Alzheimers Institute in Phoenix. Banner is conducting two studies that target the very earliest brain changes while memory and thinking skills are still intact in hope of preventing the disease. (AP Photo/Matt York)
October 02, 2018 - 12:29 am
PHOENIX (AP) — Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, and scientists so far have been unable to find a treatment to stop its progression in people who already have some mental decline. So two large studies are starting much earlier, trying to prevent the disease by targeting the...
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September 22, 2018 - 4:56 pm
SANTA ROSA, Calif. (AP) — A California kindergartner can keep bringing a cannabis-based drug used for emergency treatment of a rare form of epilepsy to her public school, a judge ruled Friday. The Santa Rosa Press-Democrat reported that a judge sided with the family of 5-year-old Brooke Adams. The...
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FILE - In this March 21, 2006 file photo, pills move through a precision weighing machine at a pharmaceutical manufacturers trade show in New York. A federal watchdog agency says thousands of foster children may be getting powerful psychiatric drugs prescribed to them without required safeguards. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
September 17, 2018 - 2:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands of foster children may be getting powerful psychiatric drugs prescribed to them without basic safeguards, says a federal watchdog agency that found a failure to care for youngsters whose lives have already been disrupted. A report released Monday by the Health and Human...
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FILE - In this Dec. 24, 2017, file photo, Dallas Cowboys center Travis Frederick (72), and his wife Kaylee, right, pose for a photo as their son Oliver, reaches out to the NFL Man of the Year team nominee award presented to Frederick before an NFL football game against the Seattle Seahawks, in Arlington, Texas. Frederick's revelation that he is battling a rare neurological disorder will reverberate on and off the field for the Dallas Cowboys. They're likely to begin the season without their stalwart at center, and without knowing what will happen with their teammate's recovery. (AP Photo/Ron Jenkins, File)
August 23, 2018 - 7:10 pm
FRISCO, Texas (AP) — A year ago, Dallas Cowboys offensive lineman Joe Looney grabbed the spotlight during training camp as the prankster who took the field in star running back Ezekiel Elliott's jersey, his cover blown by the gut sticking out under No. 21. Now that Looney has become the starting...
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August 22, 2018 - 8:39 pm
ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — Dallas Cowboys center Travis Frederick said Wednesday he has been diagnosed with a rare neurological disorder that causes weakness in various parts of the body, and the four-time Pro Bowl player isn't sure on a timetable for a return. Frederick said he has received two...
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July 26, 2018 - 11:31 am
LONDON (AP) — The British government says doctors will now be able to legally prescribe cannabis-based medicines, following criticism over the denial of medical treatment to severely epileptic children. Home Secretary Sajid Javid relaxed the rules Thursday after considering expert advice from a...
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FILE - This Oct. 7, 2003 file photo shows a section of a human brain with Alzheimer's disease on display at the Museum of Neuroanatomy at the University at Buffalo, in Buffalo, N.Y. On Wednesday, July 25, 2018, two drug makers said an experimental therapy slowed mental decline by 30 percent in patients who got the highest dose in a mid-stage study, and it removed much of the sticky plaque gumming up their brains. The drug, called BAN2401, is from Eisai and Biogen. (AP Photo/David Duprey)
July 25, 2018 - 6:05 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Hopes are rising again for a drug to alter the course of Alzheimer's disease after decades of failures. An experimental therapy slowed mental decline by 30 percent in patients who got the highest dose in a mid-stage study, and it removed much of the sticky plaque gumming up their...
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In this March 23, 2017 photo provided by the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, patient Rick Karr is prepared for treatment at the facility in Toronto, Canada. Karr was the first Alzheimer's patient treated with focused ultrasound to open the blood-brain barrier. Scientists are using ultrasound waves to temporarily jiggle an opening in the brain’s protective shield, in hopes the technique one day might help drugs for Alzheimer’s, brain tumors and other diseases better reach their target. (Kevin Van Paassen/Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre via AP)
July 25, 2018 - 1:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A handful of Alzheimer's patients signed up for a bold experiment: They let scientists beam sound waves into the brain to temporarily jiggle an opening in its protective shield. The so-called blood-brain barrier prevents germs and other damaging substances from leaching in through...
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Margaret Graham, 74, has her blood pressure checked while visiting the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C., on Friday, July 13, 2018. She had participated in a multi-year study, published on Wednesday, July 25, 2018, investigating a connection between high blood pressure and the risk of mental decline. "I feel like maybe with this study, some findings may come that will develop new drugs and also new activities, exercise, theories that will help people to maintain an acceptable blood pressure level," Graham says. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)
July 25, 2018 - 9:42 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Lowering blood pressure more than usually recommended not only helps prevent heart problems, it also cuts the risk of mental decline that often leads to Alzheimer's disease, a major study finds. It's the first time a single step has been clearly shown to help prevent a dreaded...
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FILE - In this June 11, 2018 file photo, Billy Caldwell sits with his mother Charlotte. Former British Foreign Secretary William Hague called Tuesday, June 19 for the government to take steps toward legalizing marijuana. Hague changed his public stance on cannabis policy days after the government relented and allowed a 12-year-old epileptic boy to receive cannabis oil treatment that his mother said was needed to prevent life-threatening seizures. Home Secretary Sajid Javid said he was convinced after talking to clinicians that the boy, Billy Caldwell, faced a medical crisis.(Stefan Rousseau/PA via AP, File)
June 19, 2018 - 9:22 am
LONDON (AP) — The British government announced Tuesday it would move to lift its ban on cannabis-based medicines, amid mounting criticism over the denial of treatment to severely epileptic children. But it rejected calls to legalize marijuana for recreational use. Home Secretary Sajid Javid told...
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