Political corruption

FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2010, file photo, Vice President Joe Biden, left, with his son Hunter, right, at the Duke Georgetown NCAA college basketball game in Washington. Since the early days of the United States, leading politicians have had to contend with awkward problems posed by their family members. Joe Biden is the latest prominent politician to navigate this tricky terrain. (AP Photo/Nick Wass, File)
October 13, 2019 - 6:35 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Facing intense scrutiny from President Donald Trump and his Republican allies, Hunter Biden said Sunday he will step down from the board of directors of a Chinese-backed private equity firm at the end of the month as part of a pledge not to work on behalf of any foreign-owned...
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FILE - In this July 10, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump is joined by Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, second from right, as he arrives at Melsbroek Air Base, in Brussels, Belgium. Sondland, wrapped up in a congressional impeachment inquiry, was a late convert to Trump, initially supporting another candidate in the Republican primary and once refusing to participate in a fundraiser on his behalf. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
October 13, 2019 - 2:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. ambassador is expected to tell Congress that his text message reassuring another envoy that there was no quid pro quo in their interactions with Ukraine was based solely on what President Donald Trump told him, according to a person familiar with his upcoming testimony in...
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FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2019, file photo, the West Front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Impeachment may have leapfrogged to the top of the national agenda, but members of Congress still have their day jobs as legislators _ and they’re returning to work this coming week with mixed hopes of success. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
October 13, 2019 - 10:47 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Impeachment may have leapfrogged to the top of the national agenda, but members of Congress still have their day jobs as legislators, and they're returning to Washington this coming week with mixed hopes of success. It's a volatile, difficult-to-predict time in Washington as...
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FILE - In this Aug. 1, 2018, file photo, Rudy Giuliani, an attorney for President Donald Trump, speaks in Portsmouth, N.H. President Donald Trump on Saturday, Oct. 12, 2019, stood behind personal attorney Giuliani, one of his highest-profile and most vocal defenders, amid reports that federal prosecutors in the city Giuliani led as mayor are eyeing him for possible lobbying violations. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)
October 13, 2019 - 6:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Saturday stood behind personal attorney Rudy Giuliani, one of his highest-profile and most vocal defenders, amid reports that federal prosecutors in the city Giuliani led as mayor are eyeing him for possible lobbying violations. Behind the scenes, however...
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This 1865-1880 photo made available by the Library of Congress shows a damaged glass negative of President Andrew Johnson. Johnson, a Democrat, became vice president under Republican Abraham Lincoln on a unity ticket elected amid the Civil War in 1864. He became president after Lincoln’s assassination in April 1865. (Brady-Handy photograph collection/Library of Congress via AP)
October 12, 2019 - 9:46 am
Andrew Johnson has never ranked among America's most famous presidents, though he's widely considered one of the worst. He's now attracting a surge of attention, as historians and political pundits compare his impeachment trial in 1868 with the ongoing impeachment inquiry targeting President Donald...
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Former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, arrives on Capitol Hill, Friday, Oct. 11, 2019, in Washington, as she is scheduled to testify before congressional lawmakers on Friday as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
October 12, 2019 - 9:44 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Testifying in defiance of President Donald Trump's ban, former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch told House impeachment investigators Friday that Trump himself pressured the State Department to oust her from her post and get her out of the country. Yovanovitch told...
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Former US Rep. Pete Sessions speak to the McLennan County Republican Party Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019, in Waco, Texas as he runs to fill the seat of Bill Flores who is stepping down (Jerry Larson/ Waco Tribune-Herald, via AP)
October 12, 2019 - 12:48 am
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Former Republican Rep. Pete Sessions' climb back into Congress was already off to a rough start, with some in his own party suggesting he was carpetbagging by leaving the Dallas district he lost last fall to try to get elected in a far more rural and politically safe one. Now...
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Former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, arrives on Capitol Hill, Friday, Oct. 11, 2019, in Washington, as she is scheduled to testify before congressional lawmakers on Friday as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
October 11, 2019 - 10:59 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Testifying in defiance of President Donald Trump's ban, former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch told House impeachment investigators Friday that Trump himself had pressured the State Department to oust her from her post and get her out of the country. Yovanovitch told...
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Former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, arrives on Capitol Hill, Friday, Oct. 11, 2019, in Washington, as she is scheduled to testify before congressional lawmakers on Friday as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
October 11, 2019 - 2:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former U.S. Ukraine ambassador Marie Yovanovitch and the House impeachment probe (all times local): 2:30 p.m. The chairmen of three Democratic committees say they subpoenaed Marie Yovanovitch, the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, before she began closed-door...
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FILE - In this Jan. 15, 2019 file photo, Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, asks a question during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
October 11, 2019 - 10:54 am
DENVER (AP) — A simple yes-or-no question keeps tripping up Senate Republicans: Should the president ask foreign countries to investigate political rivals? A month ago the question was a legal and constitutional no-brainer. It's illegal to accept foreign help in a political campaign, an action that...
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