Prescription drug addiction

FILE - In this Tuesday, June 19, 2018 file photo Cheryl Juaire walks past a photo of her son, Corey Merrill, at her home in Marlborough, Mass. Victims of opioid addiction weren’t in the room when big decisions were hammered out in OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma’s proposal to settle claims over its role in the U.S. opioid crisis. Cheryl Juaire lost her 23-year-old son to a heroin overdose after he became addicted to prescription painkillers. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
October 06, 2019 - 3:50 pm
Victims of opioid addiction weren't in the room when OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma persuaded half the state attorneys general to settle claims over the company's role in the nationwide overdose epidemic. Now that Purdue is in federal bankruptcy court, four people whose lives were touched by...
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FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2018 file photo, Christine Gagnon, of Southington, Conn., holds a sign during a protest with others who have lost loved ones to OxyContin and opioid overdoses, outside the Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Gagnon lost her son Michael 13 months earlier. Nearly ten years ago, the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin was reformulated to discourage abuse by snorting and injecting, but it's unclear whether the harder-to-abuse format has decreased cases of addiction, overdose and death. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
July 22, 2019 - 10:42 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Dr. Raeford Brown was uniquely positioned to help the U.S. government answer a critical question: Is a new version of the painkiller OxyContin helping fight the national opioid epidemic? An expert in pain treatment at the University of Kentucky, Brown led a panel of outside...
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FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2018 file photo, Christine Gagnon, of Southington, Conn., holds a sign during a protest with others who have lost loved ones to OxyContin and opioid overdoses, outside the Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Gagnon lost her son Michael 13 months earlier. Nearly ten years ago, the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin was reformulated to discourage abuse by snorting and injecting, but it's unclear whether the harder-to-abuse format has decreased cases of addiction, overdose and death. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
July 22, 2019 - 10:37 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly a decade ago, the maker of OxyContin responded to a growing wave of opioid abuse by making the painkiller harder to snort and inject. But has that reformulation translated into fewer drug overdoses and deaths? It's a question that experts like Dr. Raeford Brown of the...
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This undated image provided by AcelRx Pharmaceuticals shows the dispenser and a tablet for the company's medication Dsuvia. On Friday, Nov. 2. 2018, U.S. regulators announced the approval of the fast-acting, super-potent opioid tablet as an alternative to IV painkillers used in hospitals. (Craig Sherod Photography/AcelRx Pharmaceuticals via AP)
November 02, 2018 - 3:24 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — U.S. regulators on Friday approved a fast-acting, super-potent opioid tablet as an alternative to IV painkillers used in hospitals. The decision by the Food and Drug Administration on Friday came over objections from critics who fear the pill will be abused. In a lengthy...
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George Barrett, left, executive chairman of the board, Cardinal Health, Inc., Dr. Joseph Mastandrea, chairman of the board, Miami-Luken, Inc., John Hammergren, chairman, president, and CEO, McKesson Corporation, J. Christopher Smith, former president and CEO, H.D. Smith Wholesale Drug Company, and Steven Collis, chairman, president, and CEO, AmerisourceBergen Corporation, are sworn in before they testify during a hearing of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, about the opioid epidemic, on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, May 8, 2018 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
May 08, 2018 - 3:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Top executives of the nation's leading wholesale drug distributors told Congress under oath Tuesday that their companies didn't help cause the nation's deadly opioid epidemic, drawing bipartisan wrath that included one lawmaker suggesting prison terms for some company officials...
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FILE - In this Feb. 4, 2007 file photo, Prince performs during halftime of the Super Bowl XLI football game in Miami. Minnesota prosecutors are planning an announcement Thursday, April 19, 2018, in their two-year investigation into Prince's death. Prince was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park estate on April 21, 2016. An autopsy found he died of an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 times more powerful than heroin. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
April 19, 2018 - 6:57 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Prince thought he was taking a common painkiller but instead ingested a counterfeit pill containing the dangerously powerful drug fentanyl, a Minnesota prosecutor said Thursday as he announced that no charges would be filed in the musician's death. Carver County Attorney Mark...
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March 11, 2018 - 10:55 am
NEW YORK (AP) — In a story March 10 about an anti-opioid protest at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Associated Press reported erroneously that Purdue Pharma was owned by Arthur, Mortimer and Raymond Sackler. Arthur Sackler died before Purdue Pharma was formed. A corrected version of the story...
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November 30, 2017 - 9:25 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials on Thursday approved the first injectable form of the leading medication to treat patients recovering from addiction to heroin, prescription painkillers and other opioids. The Food and Drug Administration approved once-a-month Sublocade for adults with opioid...
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FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, a pharmacy tech poses for a picture with hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets, the generic version of Vicodin in Edmond, Okla. A report released Wednesday, May 31, 2017 traces how a short letter in a medical journal in 1980 helped sow the seeds of today's opioid epidemic by helping to convince doctors that these powerful painkillers carried less risk of addiction than they actually do. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
May 31, 2017 - 5:37 pm
Nearly 40 years ago, a respected doctor wrote a letter to the New England Journal of Medicine with some very good news: Out of nearly 40,000 patients given powerful pain drugs in a Boston hospital, only four addictions were documented. Doctors had been wary of opioids, fearing patients would get...
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In this Jan. 19, 2017, handout photo from the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, nurse Amanda Fritsch checks the catheter delivering a drug that kept Stuart Anders’ injured leg numb for three days. Called a nerve block, the non-addictive numbing treatment substantially cut the amount of opioid painkillers that Anders otherwise would have been prescribed for his shattered femur. (University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center via AP)
May 02, 2017 - 5:18 am
BALTIMORE (AP) — A car crash shattered Stuart Anders' thigh, leaving pieces of bone sticking through his skin. Yet Anders begged emergency room doctors not to give him powerful opioid painkillers — he'd been addicted once before and panicked at the thought of relapsing. "I can't lose what I worked...
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