Publishing

En esta imagen difundida por Flatiron Books, la portada de "American Dirt", una novela de Jeanine Cummins. (Flatiron Books vía AP)
January 28, 2020 - 7:12 pm
During a trip to Mexico to visit family, writer Myriam Gurba took “American Dirt,” a novel about immigration and cartel violence that was being touted as one of the biggest U.S. releases of 2020. The writer was of mostly white descent, and Gurba felt the book didn't ring true. “I was reading the...
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This undated image released by Knopf shows Reagan Arthur, newly named executive vice president and publisher of Alfred A. Knopf. She succeeds the longtime Knopf publisher Sonny Mehta, who died in December. (Michael Lionstar/Alfred A. Knopf via AP)
January 23, 2020 - 12:04 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — One of the world's most prestigious literary publishers has chosen just its fourth editorial leader in its 105-year history: Reagan Arthur has been named executive vice president and publisher of Alfred A. Knopf, where authors have ranged from Robert A. Caro to the late Toni...
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FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2019 file photo, Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman speaks to Russian President Vladimir Putin during the talks in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. United Nations experts Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020 called for an "immediate investigation" by the United States and others into information they received that suggests that Jeff Bezos' phone was hacked after receiving a file sent from Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's WhatsApp account. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, Pool)
January 23, 2020 - 3:01 am
BOSTON (AP) — U.N. human rights experts are asking Washington to investigate a suspected Saudi hack that may have siphoned data from the personal smartphone of Jeff Bezos, Amazon founder and owner of The Washington Post. But the forensic evidence they cite comes from an incomplete study of Bezos's...
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FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2017, file photo, Jeff Bezos attends the premiere of "The Post" at The Newseum in Washington. United Nations experts on Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020 have called for "immediate investigation" by the United States into information they received that suggests that Jeff Bezos' phone was hacked after receiving a file sent from Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's WhatsApp account. (Photo by Brent N. Clarke/Invision/AP, File)
January 22, 2020 - 5:13 pm
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The cellphone of Amazon founder and Washington Post owner Jeff Bezos was hacked in what appeared to be an attempt by Saudi Arabia's crown prince to "influence, if not silence" the newspaper's reporting on the kingdom, two U.N. human rights experts said Wednesday...
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FILE - In this June 28, 2017, file photo, Pope Francis, left, and Pope Benedict XVI, meet each other on the occasion of the elevation of five new cardinals at the Vatican. Retired Pope Benedict XVI has broken his silence to reaffirm the value of priestly celibacy, co-authoring a bombshell book at the precise moment that Pope Francis is weighing whether to allow married men to be ordained to address the Catholic priest shortage. (L'Osservatore Romano/Pool photo via AP, File)
January 14, 2020 - 8:52 am
VATICAN CITY (AP) — A longtime aide distanced Emeritus Pope Benedict XVI from a new book on priestly celibacy Tuesday and asked that Benedict be removed as co-author after the project gave the impression the retired pope was trying to interfere with the reigning one. Benedict’s longtime secretary,...
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January 02, 2020 - 4:31 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A hotel operator has purchased The Times-Dispatch building in Virginia’s capital city, but the Richmond newspaper will remain in the downtown building under a long-term lease, the companies announced Thursday. The Times-Dispatch reports that its newsroom, advertising and...
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FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2019, file photo, Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., speaks during a luncheon at the National Press Club in Washington. Cummings died from complications of longtime health challenges, his office said in a statement on Oct. 17, 2019. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
December 31, 2019 - 8:43 pm
A lauded writer who brought to light stories overshadowed by prejudice. An actress and singer who helped embody the manufactured innocence of the 1950s. A self-made billionaire who rose from a childhood of Depression-era poverty and twice ran for president. This year saw the deaths of people who...
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In this undated photo provided by Random House Sonny Mehta poses for a portrait. Mehta, the urbane and astute head of Alfred A. Knopf who guided one of the book world's most esteemed imprints to new heights through a blend of prize-winning literature by Toni Morrison and Cormac McCarthy among others and blockbusters such as "Fifty Shades of Grey" and "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo," died Monday, Dec. 30, 2019, at his home in Manhattan, at age 77. (Michael Lionstar/Random House via AP)
December 31, 2019 - 9:10 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Sonny Mehta, the urbane and astute head of Alfred A. Knopf who guided one of the book world's most esteemed imprints to new heights through a blend of prize-winning literature by Toni Morrison and Cormac McCarthy among others and blockbusters such as "Fifty Shades of Grey" and "The...
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In this July 5, 2019, photo, an East Bay Times newspaper sits in the bottom row of empty news racks in the Financial District in San Francisco. Ownership changes and consolidations have left the region known as the East Bay with just a single daily newspaper. The East Bay Times, based in Walnut Creek, attempts to cover a region nearly the size of Delaware with a fraction of the staff of the former dailies. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
December 28, 2019 - 10:48 am
OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — The cities and suburbs on the eastern side of San Francisco Bay are home to 2.7 million people, a world-class University of California campus and bedroom communities for Silicon Valley that produce median incomes 50 percent higher than the national average. What they no...
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The Gardner News, with a front-page story on it's loosing status of the city's paper of record, is seen with the Gardner City Hall in the distance Friday, Dec. 20, 2019, in Gardner, Kan. The City Council voted to move legal ads to another publication in a nearby city as a cost-saving move only weeks after the city's mayor and a council member accused the paper of publishing inaccurate material. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
December 21, 2019 - 1:44 pm
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — A growing community near Kansas City has decided to stop publishing its legal notices in its hometown newspaper, describing the move as cost cutting but doing it after several officials criticized the coverage the city was receiving. The City Council in Gardner, Kansas, changed...
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