Salmon

This July 2019 photo provided by Peter Westley shows carcasses of chum salmon lie along the shore of the Koyukuk River near Huslia, Alaska. Alaska scientists and fisheries managers are investigating the deaths of salmon that may be tied to the state's unusually hot, dry summer. July was the hottest month ever recorded in Alaska. (Peter Westley, University of Alaska Fairbanks via AP)
August 23, 2019 - 6:13 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Add salmon to the list of species affected by Alaska's blistering summer temperatures, including the hottest July on record. Dead salmon have shown up in river systems throughout Alaska, and the mortalities are probably connected to warm water or low river water levels,...
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In this photo taken Monday, July 22, 2019, chinook salmon is seen after being unloaded at Fisherman's Wharf in San Francisco. California fishermen are reporting one of the best salmon fishing seasons in more than a decade, thanks to heavy rain and snow that ended the state's historic drought. It's a sharp reversal for chinook salmon, also known as king salmon, an iconic fish that helps sustain many Pacific Coast fishing communities. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
August 22, 2019 - 7:43 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Trolling off the California coast, Sarah Bates leans over the side of her boat and pulls out a long, silvery fish prized by anglers and seafood lovers: wild king salmon. Reeling in a fish "feels good every time," but this year has been surprisingly good, said Bates, a...
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In this Tuesday, July 16, 2019, drone photo released by the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Alaska Center for Energy and Power, Gov. Mike Dunleavy, center rear, poses for photos in front of a Riv-Gen Power System turbine on the bank of the Kvichak River in Igiugig, Alaska. A tiny Alaska Native village is adopting an emerging technology to transform the power of a local river into a renewable energy source. (Amanda Byrd/ University Alaska Fairbanks and Alaska Center for Energy and Power via AP)
July 17, 2019 - 6:24 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A tiny Native village in southwest Alaska has turned to an emerging technology to transform the power of a local river into a sustainable energy source that's expected to free residents from dependency on costly diesel fuel. The village council in Igiugig is the first...
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Peter Bowyer, the facility manager at AquaBounty Technologies, holds one of the last batch of conventional Atlantic salmon raised at the commercial fish farm in Albany, Ind., Wednesday, June 19, 2019. AquaBounty will be producing the first genetically modified animals approved for human food in the U.S. and one way companies are pushing to transform plants and animals, as consumer advocacy groups call for greater caution. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
June 21, 2019 - 1:11 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Inside an Indiana aquafarming complex, thousands of salmon eggs genetically modified to grow faster than normal are hatching into tiny fish. After growing to roughly 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) in indoor tanks, they could be served in restaurants by late next year. The salmon produced...
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FILE - In this Feb. 23, 2016 file photo, people try to catch fish along the Sacramento River in the San Joaquin-Sacramento River Delta, near Courtland, Calif. The federal government has sued California over water policies it says violate state environmental protections. The lawsuit filed Thursday, March 28, 2019, in federal court in Sacramento challenges a plan that went into effect in December to increase water flows in the San Joaquin River. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
March 28, 2019 - 9:22 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The federal government sued California on Thursday over a water policy it said violates the state's environmental protection law. The U.S. Department of Justice filed suit in Sacramento federal court to block a contentious plan approved in December to increase river flows in the...
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This 2009 photo provided by AquaBountyTechnologies shows a juvenile salmon raised at the company's hatchery in Fortune, Prince Edward Island, Canada. On Friday, March 8, 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it had lifted an alert had that had prevented AquaBounty from importing its salmon eggs to its Indiana facility, where they would be grown before being sold as food. (AquaBountyTechnologies via AP)
March 08, 2019 - 10:06 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. regulators on Friday gave the green light to salmon genetically modified to grow about twice as fast as normal, but the company behind it may face legal challenges before the fish can be sold domestically. The Food and Drug Administration said it lifted an alert that had...
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Protesters hold up flags during a public hearing on a draft environmental plan on proposed petroleum leasing within Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge on Monday, Feb. 11, 2019, in Anchorage, Alaska. Congress in December 2017 approved a tax bill that requires oil and gas lease sales in the refuge to raise revenue for a tax cut backed by President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
February 11, 2019 - 9:38 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Protesters in Alaska urged federal officials to keep oil rigs out of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge despite a federal law requiring lease sales in the wilderness area. At a Bureau of Land Management environmental review hearing in Anchorage, Laura Herman urged that no...
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FILE- In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, an endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in Puget Sound west of Seattle, Wash. For years, scientists have identified dams, pollution and vessel noise as causes of the troubling decline of the Pacific Northwest's resident killer whales. Now, they may have found a new and more surprising culprit: pink salmon. Salmon researchers perusing data on the website of the Center for Whale Research noticed a startling trend: that for the past two decades, significantly more of the whales have died in even-numbered years than in odd years. In a newly published paper, they speculate that the pattern is related to pink salmon, which return to the waters between Washington state and Canada in enormous numbers every other year. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
January 19, 2019 - 5:29 am
SEATTLE (AP) — Over the years, scientists have identified dams, pollution and vessel noise as causes of the troubling decline of the Pacific Northwest's resident killer whales. Now, they may have found a new and more surprising culprit: pink salmon. Four salmon researchers were perusing data on the...
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FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, an endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in Puget Sound west of Seattle as seen from a federal research vessel that has been tracking the whales. Two conservation groups say the federal government is violating the Endangered Species Act by failing to consider how salmon fishing off the West Coast is affecting endangered killer whales. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
December 18, 2018 - 3:38 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — The federal government is violating the Endangered Species Act by failing to consider how salmon fishing off the West Coast is affecting endangered killer whales, two conservation groups said Tuesday as they threatened a lawsuit. The Arizona-based Center for Biological Diversity and...
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FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, an endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in Puget Sound west of Seattle as seen from a federal research vessel that had been tracking the whales. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is proposing $1.1 billion in spending and a partial whale-watching ban to help support the recovery of Puget Sound's critically endangered orcas. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
December 13, 2018 - 5:46 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — With scientists warning that the Northwest's beloved killer whales are on the brink of extinction, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee announced dramatic plans Thursday to help the population recover — including $1.1 billion in spending and a partial whale-watching ban. "We are undertaking a...
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