Science

This Dec. 12, 2019 photo released by CINDAQ.ORG, or "Centro Investigador del Sistema Acuífero de Quintana Roo," shows a diver in the "La Mina Roja" passage of the Sagitario underwater cave system near Playa del Carmen in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. The discovery of remains of human-set fires, stacked mining debris, simple stone tools, navigational aids, and digging sites suggest humans went into the caves around 12,000 to 14,000 years ago, seeking iron-rich red ocher, which early peoples in the Americas prized for decoration and rituals. (CINDAQ.ORG via AP)
July 03, 2020 - 2:03 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Experts and cave divers in Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula have found ocher mines that are some of the oldest on the continent, which could explain why ancient skeletons were found in the narrow, twisting labyrinths of now-submerged sinkhole caves. Since skeletal remains like “Naia,”...
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July 03, 2020 - 3:55 am
JERUSALEM (AP) — A state-linked technology company in the United Arab Emirates has signed a partnership with two major Israeli defense firms to research ways of combating the coronavirus pandemic. The agreement, announced late Thursday, comes just weeks after the UAE warned Israel that proceeding...
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Nightbird Restaurant chef and owner Kim Alter, left, mimics giving a hug to nurse practitioner Sydney Gressel, center, and patient care technician Matt Phillips after delivering dinner to them at University of California at San Francisco Benioff Children's Hospital in San Francisco, March 27, 2020. A group of tech-savvy, entrepreneurial San Francisco friends wanted to help two groups devastated by the coronavirus pandemic. They came up with a plan that involved soliciting donations, tapping friends in the restaurant world and getting San Francisco hospitals to accept free food cooked up by some of the city's top chefs. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
July 02, 2020 - 11:08 am
Acts of kindness may not be that random after all. Science says being kind pays off. Research shows that acts of kindness make us feel better and healthier. Kindness is also key to how we evolved and survived as a species, scientists say. We are hard-wired to be kind. Kindness “is as bred in our...
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This photo released Thursday, July 2, 2020, by the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, shows a building after it was damaged by a fire, at the Natanz uranium enrichment facility some 200 miles (322 kilometers) south of the capital Tehran, Iran. A fire burned the building above Iran's underground Natanz nuclear enrichment facility, though officials say it did not affect its centrifuge operation or cause any release of radiation. The Atomic Energy Organization of Iran sought to downplay the fire Thursday, calling it an "incident" that only affected an "industrial shed." (Atomic Energy Organization of Iran via AP)
July 02, 2020 - 10:26 am
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — A fire and an explosion struck a building above Iran's underground Natanz nuclear enrichment facility early on Thursday, a site that U.S.-based analysts identified as a new centrifuge production plant. The Atomic Energy Organization of Iran sought to downplay the...
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FILE — In this June 2, 2020 file photo, a demonstrator holds a placard during a protest against the tobacco ban outside parliament in Cape Town, South Africa. South Africa is three months into a ban on the sale of cigarettes and other tobacco products, an unusual tactic employed by a government to protect the health of its citizens during the coronavirus pandemic. The country is one of just a few around the world to have banned tobacco sales during the pandemic and the only one to still have it in place. (AP Photo/Nardus Engelbrecht/File)
July 02, 2020 - 7:29 am
CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) — The message was dropped into a WhatsApp group used by suburban moms in South Africa. Amid the grumblings over homeschooling during lockdown, one mom went off topic: “Does anyone know where to get illegal cigarettes? I just need a few. I'm desperate.” She emphasized...
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FILE - In this Saturday, June 6, 2020 file photo, demonstrators gather near the White House in Washington, to protest the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis. Public health experts say there is little evidence that the protests that erupted after Floyd’s death caused a significant increase in coronavirus infections. If the protests had driven an explosion in cases, experts say, the jumps would have started to become apparent within two weeks — and perhaps as early as five days. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
July 01, 2020 - 2:00 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — There is little evidence that the protests that erupted after George Floyd’s death caused a significant increase in U.S. coronavirus infections, according to public health experts. If the protests had driven an explosion in cases, experts say, the jumps would have started to become...
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People protest against Coronavirus vaccine trials in Africa, outside the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. A protest against Africa’s first COVID-19 vaccine trial is underway as experts note a worrying level of resistance and misinformation around testing on the continent.(AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)
July 01, 2020 - 10:26 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Protesters against Africa’s first COVID-19 vaccine trial burned their face masks Wednesday as experts note a worrying level of resistance and misinformation around testing on the continent. Anti-vaccine sentiment in Africa is “the worst I’ve ever seen,” the CEO of the GAVI...
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Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testifies before a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 30, 2020. (Kevin Dietsch/Pool via AP)
June 30, 2020 - 2:15 pm
The U.S. is “going in the wrong direction” with the coronavirus surging badly enough that Dr. Anthony Fauci told senators Tuesday some regions are putting the entire country at risk — just as schools and colleges are wrestling with how to safely reopen. With about 40,000 new cases being reported a...
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This 2020 electron microscope made available by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention image shows the spherical coronavirus particles from the first U.S. case of COVID-19. Two new studies published online Monday, June 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine, suggest more than 250 U.S. children have developed a serious inflammatory condition linked to the coronavirus and while most recovered after intensive-care treatment, the potential for long-term or permanent damage is unknown. (C.S. Goldsmith, A. Tamin/CDC via AP)
June 29, 2020 - 8:55 pm
At least 285 U.S. children have developed a serious inflammatory condition linked to the coronavirus and while most recovered, the potential for long-term or permanent damage is unknown, two new studies suggest. The papers, published online Monday in the New England Journal of Medicine, provide the...
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FILE - This is an April 30, 2020, file photo showing Gilead Sciences headquarters in Foster City, Calif. The maker of a drug shown to shorten recovery time for severely ill COVID-19 patients says it will charge $2,340 for a typical treatment course for people covered by government health programs in the United States and other developed countries. Gilead Sciences announced the price Monday, June 29 for remdesivir, and said the price would be $3,120 for patients with private insurance. It will sell for far less in poorer countries where generic drugmakers are being allowed to make it. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
June 29, 2020 - 11:54 am
The maker of a drug shown to shorten recovery time for severely ill COVID-19 patients says it will charge $2,340 for a typical treatment course for people covered by government health programs in the United States and other developed countries. Gilead Sciences announced the price Monday for...
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