Social media industry

Twitter's Colin Crowell, head of global public policy, arrives for the closed door meeting with the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill, Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017 in Washington. Officials from Twitter are on Capitol Hill as part of the House and Senate investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 elections. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
September 28, 2017 - 4:40 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Twitter's sessions with congressional investigators (all times local): 4:35 p.m. Social media company Twitter says it took action to suspend about two dozen accounts that were linked to fake, Russia-tied Facebook accounts were pushing divisive social and political...
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FILE - In this April 18, 2017, file photo, conference workers speak in front of a demo booth at Facebook's annual F8 developer conference, in San Jose, Calif. One of the congressional committees investigating Russia’s interference in the 2016 election has invited the tech giants Facebook, Twitter and the parent company of Google to appear for a public hearing on Nov. 1. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
September 27, 2017 - 9:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The House and Senate intelligence committees are inviting tech giants Facebook, Twitter and Alphabet — the parent company of Google — to appear for public hearings as part of their investigations into Russia's interference in the 2016 election, The Associated Press has learned...
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September 22, 2017 - 4:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Legislation floated by two Democratic senators would enhance transparency for online political ads, requiring social media companies like Facebook and Twitter to keep a public file of them. The bill by Sens. Mark Warner of Virginia and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota would try to fill...
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FILE - In this Oct. 15, 2013, file photo, Chuck Goolsbee, site director for Facebook's Prineville data centers, shows the computer servers that store users' photos and other data, at the Facebook site in Prineville, Ore. Facebook is making good on plans to expand its high-tech data center already under construction in central New Mexico. Gov. Susana Martinez's office announced early Tuesday, July 18, that the company will build a second building at the site near Los Lunas, just south of Albuquerque. (Andy Tullis/The Bulletin, via AP, File)
July 18, 2017 - 1:22 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Facebook's plans for New Mexico now call for a half-billion-dollar investment and a data center that will span an area equal to 17 football fields. Gov. Susana Martinez's office announced early Tuesday that the social media giant will be doubling its investment in the state...
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FILE - In this June 17, 2016 file photo, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull raises his hands as he speaks during a leaders debate hosted by Facebook Australia and News.com.au in Sydney. The Australian government on Friday, July 14, 2017, proposed a new cybersecurity law to force global technology companies such as Facebook and Google to help police by unscrambling encrypted messages sent by suspected extremists and other criminals. (Lukas Coch/Pool Photo via AP, File)
July 14, 2017 - 3:36 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — The Australian government on Friday proposed a new cybersecurity law to force global technology companies such as Facebook and Google to help police by unscrambling encrypted messages sent by suspected extremists and other criminals. But some experts, as well as Facebook...
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July 14, 2017 - 12:01 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — The Australian government on Friday proposed a new cybersecurity law to force global technology companies such as Facebook and Google to help police by unscrambling encrypted messages sent by suspected extremists and other criminals. But some experts, as well as Facebook...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, June 28, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks during an energy roundtable with tribal, state and local leaders in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, in Washington. Trump’s latest tweets attacking a female TV host would get him fired, or at least reprimanded if he was a regular person or even regular CEO. Of course, he isn’t. But experts say it’s a mistake to think that because the president is getting away with sending out crude tweets, others would too. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
June 30, 2017 - 10:27 am
NEW YORK (AP) — If President Donald Trump were anyone else, he'd be fired, or at least reprimanded, for his latest tweets attacking a female TV host, social media and workplace experts say. And if he were to look for a job, the experts say, these and past tweets would raise red flags for companies...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, June 28, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks during an energy roundtable with tribal, state and local leaders in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, in Washington. Trump’s latest tweets attacking a female TV host would get him fired, or at least reprimanded if he was a regular person or even regular CEO. Of course, he isn’t. But experts say it’s a mistake to think that because the president is getting away with sending out crude tweets, others would too. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
June 30, 2017 - 12:05 am
NEW YORK (AP) — If President Donald Trump were anyone else, he'd be fired, or at least reprimanded, for his latest tweets attacking a female TV host, social media and workplace experts say. And if he were to look for a job, the experts say, these and past tweets would raise red flags for companies...
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German Chancellor Angela Merkel talks with President Donald Trump during a family photo with G7 leaders at the Ancient Greek Theater of Taormina, during the G7 Summit, Friday, May 26, 2017, in Taormina, Italy. From left, European Council President Donald Tusk, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Merkel, and Trump. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
May 26, 2017 - 1:13 pm
TAORMINA, Sicily (AP) — The Latest on the G-7 summit in Taormina, Sicily (all times local): 7:00 p.m. Group of Seven leaders are appealing to internet providers and social media companies to join the fight against terrorism. The leaders meeting in Taormina, Sicily signed a declaration pledging to...
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FILE - In this March 2, 2017, file photo, a banner for Snap Inc. hangs from the front of the New York Stock Exchange, in New York. Snap’s stock may be heading for an opening below its first day closing price for the first time as people try to determine the tech company’s worth. Shares are down more than 3 percent to $23.00 in premarket trading on Tuesday, March 7. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
March 07, 2017 - 10:47 am
NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — Anyone wanting to invest in the company that owns Snapchat now has an opportunity to do something that early investors were unable to do: buy shares for less than they cost on the first day of trading three days ago. After tumbling 12 percent Monday, shares of Snap Inc. fell...
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