Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

Food Marketing Institute lawyer Evan Young speaks to reporters outside the Supreme Court after the high court heard arguments in the supermarket trade association’s case Monday, April 22, 2019, in Washington. FMI is arguing that the government shouldn’t release data on the government's food assistance program, previously known as food stamps, that’s being sought by South Dakota’s Argus Leader newspaper. The paper wants to know how much money goes annually to each store that participates in the government’s $65 billion-a-year Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (AP Photo/Jessica Gresko)
April 22, 2019 - 4:30 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday seemed inclined to rule against a South Dakota newspaper seeking data about the government's food assistance program, previously known as food stamps. The high court was hearing arguments in a case originally brought by the Argus Leader newspaper, which...
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In this April 9, 2019, photo, Argus Leader investigative reporter Jonathan Ellis and news director Cory Myers in the newsroom in Sioux Falls, S.D. In 2010, reporters at South Dakota’s Argus Leader newspaper came up with the idea of requesting data about the government’s food assistance program. They thought the information about the $65-billion dollar-a year program, previously known as food stamps, could lead to a series of stories and help them identify possible fraud. But the government didn’t provide everything the paper wanted. Trying to get the data has taken the paper more than eight years and landed the case at the Supreme Court. (Briana Sanchez/The Argus Leader via AP)
April 20, 2019 - 4:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the summer of 2010, reporters at South Dakota's Argus Leader newspaper decided to request data about the government's food assistance program, previously known as food stamps. They thought the information could lead to a series of stories and potentially help them identify...
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FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2018, file photo, Walmart associate Alicia Carter fulfills online grocery orders at a Walmart Supercenter in Houston. Amazon and Walmart on Thursday, April 18, 2019, are kicking off a two-year pilot established by the government to allow low-income shoppers on government food assistance in New York to shop and pay for their groceries online. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
April 18, 2019 - 6:39 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon and Walmart on Thursday kicked off a two-year government pilot program allowing low-income shoppers on government food assistance in New York to shop and pay for their groceries online for the first time. ShopRite will join the two retailers on the program early next week,...
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Three-year-old Ailianie Hernandez waits with her mother Julianna Ageljo to apply for the nutritional assistance program at the Department of Family Affairs, in Bayamon, Puerto Rico, Friday, March 29, 2019. Hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans are feeling the sting of what the territorial government says are insufficient federal funds to help the island recover from the Category 4 storm amid a 12-year recession. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)
March 29, 2019 - 12:19 pm
BAYAMON, Puerto Rico (AP) — Iraida Vargas can no longer afford the two kinds of insulin her aging mother needs and has stopped buying fresh fruit and vegetables as billions of dollars in federal funds that help Puerto Ricans buy food, get medical treatment and recover from Hurricane Maria dwindle...
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Doris Cochran poses for a portrait in her apartment in Arlington, Va., on Friday, Jan. 18, 2019. Cochran is a disabled mother of two young boys living in subsidized housing in Arlington, Virginia. She’s stockpiling canned foods to try to make sure her family won’t go hungry if her food stamps run out. She says she just doesn’t know “what’s going to happen” and that’s what scares her the most. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
January 22, 2019 - 12:21 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Doris Cochran, a disabled mother of two young boys, is stockpiling canned foods these days, filling her shelves with noodle soup, green beans, peaches and pears — anything that can last for months or even years. Her pantry looks as though she's preparing for a winter storm. But...
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In this Jan. 10, 2019, photo, Will Kohler, an IRS tax examiner, holds a protest sign as union members and other federal employees rally to call for an end to the partial government shutdown outside the IRS site, in Covington, Ky. Kohler applied for unemployment after getting furloughed but said his application is in limbo because the Treasury Department office that needs to verify his claim is closed as a result of the shutdown. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
January 17, 2019 - 8:40 pm
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Thousands of federal employees and their families are applying for unemployment and food stamps to get by as the longest government shutdown in U.S. history drags on with no end in sight. But for some of them, it has been an exercise in confusion and frustration. Others,...
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A Marine stands by the door to the West Wing of the White House, Tuesday Jan. 8, 2019, in Washington, as television lights are at the ready a few hours before President Donald Trump is expected to make an address to the nation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
January 08, 2019 - 7:48 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration says benefits under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as food stamps, will be funded through February should the government shutdown continue. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue is asking states to issue the February benefits on or...
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December 26, 2018 - 5:53 am
ROCK HILL, S.C. (AP) — A South Carolina man says he used the $70 he gets each month in food stamps to cook a Christmas meal for his community. Merrit Eggleston tells WSOC-TV that he starts each morning by asking God who he can help that day. On Tuesday, he set up a tent outside his Rock Hill home...
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President Donald Trump listens to Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue during a signing ceremony for H.R. 2, the "Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018," in the South Court Auditorium of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, on the White House complex, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
December 20, 2018 - 5:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is setting out to do what this year's farm bill didn't: tighten work requirements for millions of Americans who receive federal food assistance. The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Thursday proposed a rule that would restrict the ability of states to...
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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., joined from left by Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., and Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., speak following their weekly strategy session, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. Under pressure from President Donald Trump and many of his Republican colleagues, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that he will bring legislation to the floor to overhaul the nation's sentencing laws. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
December 11, 2018 - 4:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate voted overwhelmingly Tuesday for a sweeping agriculture bill that will fund key farm safety net programs for the next five years without making significant changes to the food stamp program. The vote was 87-13. The House is expected to pass the measure soon and send it...
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