Surface runoff pollution

In this picture taken on Thursday, May 21, 2020, Italian Lazio region's environmental agency biologist Salvatore De Bonis shows how they perform tests on sea water during an interview with The Associated Press on a Coast Guard boat off Fiumicino, near Rome. Preliminary results from a survey of seawater quality during Italy’s coronavirus lockdown indicate a sharp reduction in pollution from human and livestock waste in the seas off Rome. Authorities stressed it was too soon to give the lockdown sole credit for the change. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)
May 30, 2020 - 3:30 am
FIUMICINO, Italy (AP) — Pollution from human and agriculture waste spilling into the seas off Rome has decreased 30% during Italy's coronavirus lockdown, preliminary results from a nationwide survey of seawater quality indicate. Authorities stressed it was too soon to give the lockdown sole credit...
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In this image provided by NASA, taken Aug. 3, 2015, phytoplankton is seen off the coast of New York, top and New Jersey, left. A new study projects that global warming’s increased rains will mean more nitrogen flowing into U.S. waterways, which can then trigger more massive blooms of algae, floating green mats, and dead zones with almost no oxygen. This handout NASA satellite photo shows a large bloom of phytoplankton off the New York and New Jersey coast in August 2015. (NASA via AP)
July 27, 2017 - 2:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study projects that increases in rain from global warming could further choke U.S. waterways with fertilizer runoff that trigger dead zones and massive algae blooms. Researchers calculate that if greenhouse gas emissions keep rising, more rain will increase nitrogen flowing...
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