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File - In this July 27, 2015 file photo, military pallbearers escort the exhumed remains of unidentified crew members of the USS Oklahoma killed in the 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor that were disinterred from a gravesite at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. The military says it has identified 100 sailors and Marines killed when the USS Oklahoma capsized during the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor 76 years ago. The milestone comes two years after the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency dug up nearly 400 sets of remains from a Hawaii to identify the men who have been classified as missing since the war. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia, File)
December 01, 2017 - 4:00 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — The military has identified 100 sailors and Marines killed when the USS Oklahoma capsized during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor 76 years ago, officials said Friday. The milestone comes two years after the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency dug up nearly 400 sets of remains from...
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November 28, 2017 - 7:55 am
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina woman has been indicted on charges she took more than $100,000 from her employer. The Winston-Salem Journal reported that 41-year-old Malenna May Bruggner of Thomasville was indicted Monday on charges of stealing money from Yarbrough Transfer Co. of...
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FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 17, 2014, file photo, a person displays Netflix on a tablet in North Andover, Mass. Netflix is taking on increasing amounts of debt in order to fund its $6 billion annual commitment to original programming. Investors so far aren't fazed by the spending given continued growth in subscribers, but some analysts warn that the company could be on the verge of overextending itself. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
October 16, 2017 - 4:58 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Netflix is sinking deeper into debt in its relentless pursuit of more viewers, leaving the company little margin for error as it tries to build the world's biggest video subscription service. The big burden that Netflix is shouldering hasn't been a major concern on Wall Street...
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October 05, 2017 - 3:50 am
ATLANTA (AP) — The administrative manager at a Georgia housing agency has pleaded guilty to one count of federal program theft. U.S. Attorney John A. Horn says 34-year-old Erica L. Morris's plea was announced Wednesday. He says she admitted making more than $35,000 in personal purchases on a...
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Job seeker Alejandra Bastidas fills out an application at a job fair, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017, at Dolphin Mall in Sweetwater, Fla. On Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017, payroll processor ADP reports how many jobs private employers added in September. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)
October 04, 2017 - 8:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Hurricanes Harvey and Irma hobbled U.S. hiring last month, with businesses adding just 135,000 jobs, the fewest in nearly a year, a private survey found. Payroll processor ADP says the drop-off in job gains was concentrated in smaller businesses, particularly smaller retailers,...
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FILE - In this June 6, 2017, file photo, Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee ranking member Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., asks a question during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. A British company hired to help train Afghan intelligence officers billed the U.S. government for more than $50 million in questionable expenses that included luxury cars and exorbitant salaries paid to the “significant others” of the company’s top executives, according to a Pentagon audit. McCaskill summarized the audit’s major findings in a letter to Defense Secretary Jim Mattis that she was releasing on Aug. 9. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
August 09, 2017 - 12:55 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A British company hired to train Afghan intelligence officers billed the U.S. government for high-end cars, including Porsches and an Aston Martin, and paid the "significant others" of the firm's top executives six-figure salaries even though there's no proof they did any work,...
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FILE - In this June 6, 2017, file photo, Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee ranking member Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., asks a question during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. A British company hired to help train Afghan intelligence officers billed the U.S. government for more than $50 million in questionable expenses that included luxury cars and exorbitant salaries paid to the “significant others” of the company’s top executives, according to a Pentagon audit. McCaskill summarized the audit’s major findings in a letter to Defense Secretary Jim Mattis that she was releasing on Aug. 9. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
August 09, 2017 - 9:58 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A British company hired to help train Afghan intelligence officers billed the U.S. government for more than $50 million in questionable expenses that included luxury cars and exorbitant salaries paid to the "significant others" of the company's top executives, according to a...
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FILE - In this June 6, 2017, file photo, Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee ranking member Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., asks a question during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. A British company hired to help train Afghan intelligence officers billed the U.S. government for more than $50 million in questionable expenses that included luxury cars and exorbitant salaries paid to the “significant others” of the company’s top executives, according to a Pentagon audit. McCaskill summarized the audit’s major findings in a letter to Defense Secretary Jim Mattis that she was releasing on Aug. 9. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
August 09, 2017 - 8:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A British company hired to help train Afghan intelligence officers billed the U.S. government for more than $50 million in questionable expenses that included luxury cars and exorbitant salaries paid to the "significant others" of the company's top executives, according to a...
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In this photo taken March 30, 2017, Ismail Royer poses for a photograph in Arlington, Va. Royer was been released from prison after serving more than 13 years on charges that he provided assistance to friends who wanted to join the Taliban after the Sept. 11 attacks. Dozens of convicts serving time in U.S. prisons for terror-related offenses are slated to be released in the next several years, prompting the question: Should Americans be afraid? (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
August 05, 2017 - 9:45 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Dozens of convicts serving time in U.S. prisons for terrorism-related offenses are due to be released in the next several years, raising the question whether that's something Americans should fear. There's no easy answer. Since the Sept. 11 attacks, the United States has worked...
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July 25, 2017 - 1:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The IRS is seeing a big drop in the number of tax refunds stolen by identity thieves after the agency teamed up with tax preparers to fight the problem, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said Tuesday. The number of victims was nearly cut in half last year, compared to the previous...
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