Technology law and ethics

FILE - In this Nov. 20, 2019, file photo, a gas station that was attacked during protests over rises in government-set gasoline prices is reflected in a puddle, in Tehran, Iran. Internet connectivity is trickling back in Iran after the government shut down access to the rest of the world for more than four days in response to unrest apparently triggered by a gasoline price hike. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi, File)
November 21, 2019 - 5:20 pm
Internet connectivity is trickling back in Iran after the government shut down access to the rest of the world for more than four days in response to unrest apparently triggered by a gasoline price hike. The shutdown across a nation of 80 million people was the first to effectively isolate a modern...
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FILE - This combination of file photos shows the logos for Amazon, top, and Microsoft. . Amazon is protesting the Pentagon’s decision to award a huge cloud-computing contract to Microsoft, citing “unmistakable bias” in the decision. Amazon’s competitive bid for the “war cloud” drew criticism from President Donald Trump and its business rivals. (AP Photo/Richard Drew and Ted S. Warren, File)
November 15, 2019 - 3:12 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Friday he was certain that the awarding of a $10 billion cloud-computing contract to Microsoft instead of Amazon was done fairly. The Pentagon awarded the contract to Microsoft in late October, and Amazon said there was “unmistakable...
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Police officers cross a wall at a crime scene in Halle, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019 after a shooting incident. A gunman fired several shots on Wednesday in the German city of Halle. Police say a person has been arrested after a shooting that left two people dead. (Sebastian Willnow/dpa via AP)
October 15, 2019 - 2:04 am
BERLIN (AP) — Germany's security services are seeking greater powers to fight the kind of far-right extremism behind last week's synagogue attack, including requiring internet companies to report illegal hate speech. The heads of Germany's domestic intelligence service BfV and the Federal Criminal...
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September 18, 2019 - 6:51 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will be in Washington Thursday to meet with lawmakers and talk about internet regulation. The company said the meetings are not public and it did not give details on whom Zuckerberg is meeting with and what, exactly, he'll discuss. Facebook is under...
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House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., leads his panel to approve guidelines for impeachment investigation hearings on President Donald Trump, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
September 13, 2019 - 5:40 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers investigating the market dominance of Big Tech on Friday asked Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple for a broad range of documents, marking a step forward in Congress' bipartisan probe of the companies. Letters went out to the four companies from the leaders of the House...
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David L. Anderson, U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California, left, gestures next to John F. Bennett, Special Agent in Charge, Federal Bureau of Investigation, as they speak at a news conference to announce charges against Anthony Levandowski at a federal courthouse in San Jose, Calif., Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2019. Levandowski, a former Google engineer, was charged Tuesday with stealing closely guarded secrets that he later sold to Uber as the ride-hailing service scrambled to catch up in the high-stakes race to build robotic vehicles. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
August 27, 2019 - 4:28 pm
SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — A former Google engineer was charged Tuesday with stealing self-driving car technology from the company shortly before he joined Uber's efforts to catch up in the high-stakes race to build robotic vehicles. The indictment filed by the U.S. attorney's office in San Jose,...
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FILE - In this July 12, 2018, file photo, then-FBI Deputy Assistant Director Peter Strzok, testifies before a House Judiciary Committee joint hearing on "oversight of FBI and Department of Justice actions surrounding the 2016 election" on Capitol Hill in Washington. Strzok, who wrote derogatory text messages about Donald Trump, filed a lawsuit Tuesday charging that the bureau caved to “unrelenting pressure” from the president when it fired him. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
August 06, 2019 - 2:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A veteran FBI agent who wrote derogatory text messages about Donald Trump filed a lawsuit Tuesday charging that the bureau caved to "unrelenting pressure" from the president when it fired him. The suit from Peter Strzok also alleges he was unfairly punished for expressing his...
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Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, speaks at the AARP Presidential Candidates Forum at the Hotel at Kirkwood Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Wednesday, July 17, 2019. (Olivia Sun/The Des Moines Register via AP)
July 25, 2019 - 7:45 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard is suing Google for $50 million, accusing the internet company of suspending her advertising account in the hours after last month's debate because it was trying to silence her. Tulsi Now Inc., a campaign committee for the candidate...
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William Talbott II pleads his innocence before a judge sentences him to life without parole at the Snohomish County Courthouse on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 in Everett, Wash. Talbott, convicted of killing a young Canadian couple more than three decades ago after a trial that hinged on DNA evidence and newly-emerged genealogical technology, was sentenced by a judge in Washington state Wednesday to life in prison. (Andy Bronson/The Herald via AP)
July 24, 2019 - 7:12 pm
EVERETT, Wash. (AP) — A man convicted of killing a young Canadian couple more than three decades ago after a trial that hinged on DNA evidence and newly-emerged genealogical technology was sentenced in Washington state Wednesday to life in prison. William Talbott II received two consecutive life...
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FILE-In this Wednesday, April 10, 2019 file photo, prison staff work at Lee Correctional Institution, in Bishopville, S.C. A pair of federal lawsuits accuses South Carolina prisons officials of constitutional violations surrounding a riot in which seven inmates were killed at an institution last year. The wrongful death lawsuits were filed Tuesday and provided to The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Meg Kinnard, File)
July 23, 2019 - 1:43 pm
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Two lawsuits filed Tuesday allege that South Carolina corrections officials violated prisoners' constitutional rights by failing to prevent a riot in which seven inmates were killed last year. In the lawsuits, advance copies of which were provided to The Associated Press...
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