Tribal governments

FILE - In this Aug. 10, 2005, file photo, tourist Chris Farthing from Suffolks County, England, takes a picture while visiting Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico. U.S. land managers no longer plan to move forward in March with the sale of oil and gas leases that include land near Chaco Culture National Historical Park. The decision Friday, Feb. 8, 2019, by the federal Bureau of Land Management comes after tribal leaders and others criticized the agency for pushing ahead with drilling permit reviews and preparations for energy leases near the site. (AP Photo/Jeff Geissler, File)
February 08, 2019 - 7:47 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — U.S. land managers no longer plan to move forward next month with selling oil and gas leases near a national park, saying Friday they need to gather more information before they put up the land for bidding in New Mexico. The decision by the federal Bureau of Land Management...
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FILE - In this Aug. 10, 2005, file photo, tourist Chris Farthing from Suffolks County, England, takes a picture while visiting Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico. The Bureau of Land Management has rescheduled an oil and gas lease sale for March 28, 2019, that includes several parcels that are within 10 miles of the park. The agency says the sale was pushed back to accommodate a public protest period that was delayed due to the recent government shutdown. (AP Photo/Jeff Geissler, File)
January 31, 2019 - 2:12 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — U.S. land managers will move forward in March with the sale of oil and gas leases that include land near Chaco Culture National Historical Park in New Mexico and other areas sacred to Native American tribes. The sale comes as Democratic members of Congress, tribal leaders...
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January 12, 2019 - 12:51 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Fallout from the federal government shutdown is hurting hundreds of Native American tribes and entities that serve them. The pain is especially deep in tribal communities with high rates of poverty and unemployment, and where one person often supports an extended family. The...
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Clayvin Herrera poses for a picture on the plaza of the Supreme Court, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019, in Washington. The U.S. Supreme is reviewing a case in which Clayvin Herrera, a Crow tribal member and former tribal game warden from Montana, is asserting his right under a 150-year-old treaty with the U.S. government to hunt elk in the Bighorn National Forest in Wyoming. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
January 08, 2019 - 7:55 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Clayvin Herrera wound up with a fine of more than $8,000 for hunting elk in Wyoming's Bighorn National Forest after he posted photos online of his kill, showing off the way showing off often happens these days. The Crow tribe member's defense, however, in a case that has gotten...
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Former Afghan President Hamid Karzai speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Kabul, Afghanistan, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. Karzai said Thursday that he sees a role for the Taliban in his country after the war -- in a future, peaceful Afghanistan. Karzai also said that five Taliban leaders who were freed from the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay in exchange for American army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl are “good individuals, good Afghans” who should have a role in peace negotiations. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)
November 01, 2018 - 11:47 am
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Former Afghan president Hamid Karzai, who still wields considerable influence in today's Afghanistan despite being out of office for four years, said Thursday he welcomes the entry of five Taliban leaders who were freed from the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay in...
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FILE - In a Oct. 24, 2005 file photo, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., greets representatives from the nine Oregon tribes, during a meeting at the Native American Studies and Cultural Center in Portland, Ore. McCain helped usher through Congress some of the most pivotal legislation in Indian Country, including the right for tribes to open casinos. That legacy also includes criticism for seemingly favoring corporate interests over tribes. (Jamie Francis/The Oregonian via AP, File)
September 08, 2018 - 1:23 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — John McCain hadn't been elected to the U.S. Senate when a fellow veteran and friend spotted him at the annual Navajo Nation Fair. "Someone should tell this representative that he's only a representative ... this is not even his district," former Navajo Chairman and President...
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In this July 29, 2017 photo provided by KYUK-TV shows a gray whale that was killed in the Kuskokwim River is butchered and the meat and blubber distributed. Indigenous hunters in Alaska initially believed they were legally hunting a beluga whale when they unlawfully killed a protected gray whale with harpoons and guns after the massive animal strayed into a river last year, according to a federal investigative report. The report, released to The Associated Press through a public records, says that after the shooting began, the hunters then believed the whale to be a bowhead and that the harvest would be theirs as the first to shoot or harpoon it. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration decided not to prosecute the hunters. Instead it sent letters advising leaders in three villages about the limits to subsistence whaling. (Katie Basile/KYUK via AP)
August 20, 2018 - 7:19 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Indigenous hunters in Alaska initially believed they were legally hunting a beluga whale when they unlawfully killed a protected gray whale with harpoons and guns after the massive animal strayed into a river last year, a federal investigative report said. After the...
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August 09, 2018 - 9:21 am
SANAA, Yemen (AP) — An airstrike by the Saudi-led coalition fighting Shiite rebels hit a bus in a market in northern Yemen on Thursday, killing at least 43 people, including children, and wounding as many as 63, Yemen's rebel-run Health Ministry said. The Saudi-led coalition, meanwhile, said it...
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FILE - In this March 30, 1942 file photo, Cpl. George Bushy, left, a member of the military guard which supervised the departure of 237 Japanese people for California, holds the youngest child of Shigeho Kitamoto, center, as she and her children are evacuated from Bainbridge Island, Wash. Throughout American history, during times of war and unrest, authorities have cited various reasons and laws to take children away from their parents. Examples include Native American boarding schools, Japanese internment camps and deportations that happened during the Great Depression. (AP Photo/File)
June 20, 2018 - 4:58 am
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Some critics of the forced separation of Latino children from their migrant parents say the practice is unprecedented. But it's not the first time the U.S. government has split up families, detained children or allowed others to do so. Throughout American history, during...
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Indigenous leaders speak at a news conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, on Friday, March 9, 2018, prior to a planned protest over a pipeline expansion project that would pump oil from Canada's tar sands to the Pacific Coast. Thousands are expected to march Saturday in the Metro Vancouver area. (AP Photo/Phuong Le)
March 10, 2018 - 1:48 am
VANCOUVER, British Columbia (AP) — Indigenous leaders are calling on people to raise their voices Saturday to stop a $5.7 billion pipeline ($7.4 billion Canadian) expansion project that pumps oil from Canada's tar sands to the Pacific Coast. The Trans Mountain pipeline expansion by the Canadian...
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