United States Supreme Court decisions

This undated photo provided by the Bernie Sanders campaign in July 2019 shows him as a child, center, with his mother, Dorothy; father, Eli; and brother, Larry. For most of his career, Bernie Sanders has avoided sharing details of his own story, rarely linking policy proposals to his personal experience. But relatives and former classmates who grew up alongside Sanders _ and occasionally now Sanders himself _ say there are clear connections between the candidate’s Brooklyn boyhood and his decades of speeches and legislative proposals aimed at leveling the economic playing field. (Bernie Sanders campaign via AP)
July 21, 2019 - 12:27 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Back on Brooklyn College's red brick campus this winter to launch his second bid for the White House, Bernie Sanders set aside rhetoric for a few minutes to acknowledge the neighborhood where he grew up. The irascible Vermont senator recalled that his father had come to Brooklyn as...
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FILE - In this Sept. 29, 2009 file photo Associate Justice John Paul Stevens, center, sits for a group photograph at the Supreme Court in Washington. Stevens, the bow-tied, independent-thinking, Republican-nominated justice who unexpectedly emerged as the Supreme Court's leading liberal, died Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., after suffering a stroke Monday. He was 99. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
July 17, 2019 - 8:59 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — John Paul Stevens moved left as the Supreme Court shifted to the right during his nearly 35 years as a justice. That's how the bow-tie wearing Republican from the Midwest emerged as the leader of the high court's liberal wing and a strong proponent of abortion rights, consumer...
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FILE - In this April 30, 2014 file photo, retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens prepares to testify on the ever-increasing amount of money spent on elections as he appears before the Senate Rules Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Stevens, the bow-tied, independent-thinking, Republican-nominated justice who unexpectedly emerged as the Supreme Court's leading liberal, died Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., after suffering a stroke Monday. He was 99. (AP Photo, File)
July 16, 2019 - 11:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — John Paul Stevens, the bow-tied, independent-thinking, Republican-nominated justice who unexpectedly emerged as the Supreme Court's leading liberal, died Tuesday in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, after suffering a stroke Monday. He was 99. During nearly 35 years on the court, Stevens...
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Attorney General William Barr speaks to reporters after a tour of a federal prison Monday, July 8, 2019, in Edgefield, S.C. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
July 09, 2019 - 12:27 am
EDGEFIELD, S.C. (AP) — Attorney General William Barr said Monday he sees a way to legally require 2020 census respondents to declare whether or not they are citizens, despite a Supreme Court ruling that forbade asking the question. In an interview with The Associated Press, Barr said the Trump...
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Nana Gyamfi, executive director of the Black Alliance for Just Immigration, left, reads a statement as Gustavo Torres, right, executive director of CASA, an advocacy group for the immigrant community, stands with his activists, after the Supreme Court put a hold on the Trump administration's effort to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 27, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
July 01, 2019 - 6:02 pm
President Donald Trump said he has asked about delaying the 2020 census over a citizenship question, but experts say any delay could gum up the U.S. Census Bureau's finely calibrated timetable for the 10-year count. Monday was the deadline to start printing the 600 million documents that will be...
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June 28, 2019 - 9:11 pm
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A federal judge blocked an Indiana law that would ban a second-trimester abortion procedure on Friday, just days before the law was set to come into force. The order putting the Indiana law on hold was released hours after the U.S. Supreme Court declined to revive a similar law...
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Demonstrators gather at the Supreme Court as the justices finish the term with key decisions on gerrymandering and a census case involving an attempt by the Trump administration to ask everyone about their citizenship status in the 2020 census, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 27, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 27, 2019 - 7:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — When North Carolina drew its most recent political maps, state leaders split a historically black university in Greensboro into two congressional districts that critics say diluted the voting power of African Americans on campus. Lawmakers defended it as partisan gerrymandering —...
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FILE - In this March 14, 2019 file photo Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross testifies during the House Oversight Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. New evidence paints a "disturbing picture" that racial discrimination may be the motive behind the Trump administration's push to ask everyone in the country about citizenship status, a federal judge wrote in a filing, Monday, June 24, 2019. In his court filing, U.S. District Judge George Hazel of Maryland reasoned that new evidence "potentially connects the dots between a discriminatory purpose" and a decision by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to add the citizenship question. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
June 24, 2019 - 1:21 pm
BALTIMORE (AP) — New evidence paints a "disturbing picture" that racial discrimination may be the motive behind the Trump administration's push to ask everyone in the country about citizenship status, a federal judge wrote in a Monday filing. Last week, U.S. District Judge George Hazel of Maryland...
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FILE - In this March 21, 2019, file photo, gamblers line up to place bets on the NCAA men's college basketball tournament at the Borgata casino in Atlantic City N.J. This is the first March Madness tournament since legal gambling expanded last year in the U.S. The spread of legalized sports betting is largely following regional boundaries. Lawmakers across the Northeast and upper Midwest have generally approved it or are still considering doing so this year. But in the Deep South and far West, fewer states are rushing in a year after the US Supreme Court cleared the way for legal sports betting nationally. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry, File)
June 23, 2019 - 12:28 pm
CHERRY HILL, N.J. (AP) — In the year since the U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for every state to legalize sports betting , a regional divide has opened as states decide whether to expand their gambling options. By year's end, legalization is possible in a dozen states in the Northeast and...
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FILE - In this June 14, 2010 file photograph, Clemmie Flemming points out to prosecutor Doug Evans, center, where she spotted Curtis Giovanni Flowers on the morning of four slayings at Tardy Furniture in Greenwood, Miss. Evans, a Mississippi prosecutor who has tried the same man six times in a death penalty case now will decide whether to seek a seventh trial after the U.S. Supreme Court found racial bias in jury selection. (Taylor Kuykendall/The Commonwealth via AP, File)
June 22, 2019 - 9:44 am
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A Mississippi prosecutor has tried and failed six times to send Curtis Flowers to the death chamber, with the latest trial conviction and death sentence overturned on Friday because of racial bias in jury selection. Now, that same prosecutor must decide whether to try Flowers...
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