Workplace discrimination

April 14, 2017 - 6:52 pm
KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARK, Calif. (AP) — U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is personally encouraging National Park Service employees to report any forms of workplace harassment they experience or witness, he said Friday during a two-day swing through parks, including Yosemite, where the former...
Read More
April 14, 2017 - 6:11 pm
KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARK, Calif. (AP) — U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is personally encouraging National Park Service employees to report any forms of workplace harassment they experience or witness, he said Friday during a two-day swing through parks, including Yosemite, where the former...
Read More
FILE - This Oct. 20, 2015, file photo, shows a sign outside Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. Google says it is "taken aback" by the Labor Department’s claim that it does not compensate women fairly. The company says it conducts "rigorous analyses" that its pay practices are gender-blind and analysts who calculate suggested pay do not have access to an employee’s gender data. The company says it analyzed 52 major job categories in 2016 and found "no gender pay gap." (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
April 11, 2017 - 12:33 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Google said it's "taken aback " by the government's claim that it doesn't compensate women fairly. The company said it conducts "rigorous analyses" that its pay practices are gender-blind and found "no gender pay gap" in 52 major job categories it analyzed last year. Google added...
Read More
FILE - In this July 28, 2014 file photo, then-Yosemite National Park Superintendent Don Neubacher speaks in El Portal, Calif. Neubacher created a hostile workplace by belittling employees, using words such as “stupid,” “bozo” and “lazy,” and showing gender bias against women, a new report says. (Mark Crosse/The Fresno Bee via AP, File)
April 10, 2017 - 12:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The former superintendent of Yosemite National Park created a hostile workplace by belittling employees, using words such as "stupid," ''bozo" and "lazy," and showing gender bias against women, a new report says. Don Neubacher retired last fall after allegations that he created a...
Read More
April 07, 2017 - 10:26 pm
SWEDEN-TRUCK CRASH-THE LATEST The Latest: Swedish police haul away truck used in attack STOCKHOLM (AP) — Swedish investigators have removed the hijacked beer truck from the Stockholm department store where it ran into a crowd of pedestrians in what the prime minister says is an act of terrorism...
Read More
Members of the ANC Youth League flee from teargas and rubber bullets being fired by police, at the end of a march by the main opposition Democratic Alliance party in Johannesburg, Friday, April 7, 2017. Thousands of South Africans demonstrated in major cities against President Jacob Zuma. Zuma's dismissal of the finance minister has fueled concerns over government corruption and a struggling economy. (AP Photo/Yeshiel Panchia)
April 07, 2017 - 10:52 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Tens of thousands of South Africans demonstrated peacefully Friday in a national outpouring of anger at their scandal-tainted president, and a second agency lowered the country's credit rating to junk status a week after the firing of the respected finance minister. While...
Read More
Members of the ANC Youth League flee from teargas and rubber bullets being fired by police, at the end of a march by the main opposition Democratic Alliance party in Johannesburg, Friday, April 7, 2017. Thousands of South Africans demonstrated in major cities against President Jacob Zuma. Zuma's dismissal of the finance minister has fueled concerns over government corruption and a struggling economy. (AP Photo/Yeshiel Panchia)
April 07, 2017 - 9:36 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Tens of thousands of South Africans demonstrated peacefully Friday in a national outpouring of anger at their scandal-tainted president, while a second agency lowered the country's credit rating to junk status a week after the firing of the respected finance minister. While...
Read More
This Sept. 30, 2015 photo provided by Lambda Legal shows Kimberly Hively at the federal courthouse in Chicago. A federal appeals court ruled for the first time Tuesday, April 4, 2017, that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects LGBT employees from workplace discrimination, setting up a likely battle before the Supreme Court as gay rights advocates push to broaden the scope of the 53-year-old law. The case stems from a lawsuit by Indiana teacher Hively alleging that the Ivy Tech Community College in South Bend didn't hire her full time because she is a lesbian. (Lambda Legal via AP)
April 05, 2017 - 6:57 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — A ruling by a U.S. appeals court in Chicago could reopen the question of whether the 1964 Civil Rights Act's protections apply to LGBT workers in the same way they bar discrimination based on someone's race, religion or national origin. The immediate impact of the 7th Circuit's...
Read More
This Sept. 30, 2015 photo provided by Lambda Legal shows Kimberly Hively at the federal courthouse in Chicago. A federal appeals court ruled for the first time Tuesday, April 4, 2017, that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects LGBT employees from workplace discrimination, setting up a likely battle before the Supreme Court as gay rights advocates push to broaden the scope of the 53-year-old law. The case stems from a lawsuit by Indiana teacher Hively alleging that the Ivy Tech Community College in South Bend didn't hire her full time because she is a lesbian. (Lambda Legal via AP)
April 05, 2017 - 7:40 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Companies cannot discriminate against LGBT employees in the workplace because of their sexual orientation, a federal appeals court said, in a ruling that a gay rights group called a "game changer." The 8-to-3 decision Tuesday by the full 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago...
Read More
This Sept. 30, 2015 photo provided by Lambda Legal shows Kimberly Hively at the federal courthouse in Chicago. A federal appeals court ruled for the first time Tuesday, April 4, 2017, that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects LGBT employees from workplace discrimination, setting up a likely battle before the Supreme Court as gay rights advocates push to broaden the scope of the 53-year-old law. The case stems from a lawsuit by Indiana teacher Hively alleging that the Ivy Tech Community College in South Bend didn't hire her full time because she is a lesbian. (Lambda Legal via AP)
April 05, 2017 - 2:25 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Companies cannot discriminate against LGBT employees in the workplace because of their sexual orientation, a federal appeals court said, in a ruling that a gay rights group called a "game changer." The 8-to-3 decision Tuesday by the full 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago...
Read More

Pages