Zoology

Cheryl Hayashi uses a microscope to work on a spider in her lab at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Hayashi has collected spider silk glands of about 50 species, just a small dent in the more than 48,000 spider species known worldwide. (AP Photo/Jeremy Rehm)
August 14, 2019 - 9:13 am
NEW YORK (AP) — With two pairs of fine-tipped tweezers and the hands of a surgeon, Cheryl Hayashi began dissecting the body of a silver garden spider under her microscope. In just a few minutes she found what she was seeking: hundreds of silk glands, the organs spiders use to make their webs. Some...
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An aerial photo taken Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in Bethany Beach, Del., shows a wooden road built on pilings in one of the freshwater wetlands in coastal Delaware where the Bethany Beach Firefly, which some environmentalists want added to the federal Endangered Species List, has been previously found. (AP Photo/Gary Emeigh)
August 02, 2019 - 9:24 am
BETHANY BEACH, Del. (AP) — Peering through the darkness under the faint light of a peach-colored moon, wildlife biologist Jason Davis spots a telltale green flash in the bushes. Quick as a flash himself, Davis arcs a long-handled mesh net through the humid coastal air, ensnaring his tiny target...
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In this Tuesday, July 9, 2019 photo Northern Arizona University researcher Matt Johnson looks for tamarisk beetles along the Verde River in Clarkdale, Ariz. The beetles were brought to the U.S. from Asia to devour invasive tamarisk, or salt cedar, trees. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca)
July 26, 2019 - 8:16 pm
CLARKDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Matt Johnson treks along an Arizona riverbank and picks out a patch of yellow-tinged tamarisks. He sweeps a cloth net across the trees, hoping to scoop up beetles that munch on their evergreen-like leaves. He counts spiders, ants and leafhoppers among the catch and few...
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In this July 23, 2019 photo, Jim Andrews, a University of Vermont herpetology lecturer, holds a young northern leopard frog in Salisbury, Vt. A wet spring has resulted in a 100-fold increase in the population of the particular frog in a region of Vermont. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)
July 25, 2019 - 1:16 pm
SALISBURY, Vt. (AP) — A wet spring has caused one frog population to explode in an area of Vermont where throngs of the amphibians have been hopping through fields and lawns, darting across roads and getting flattened by cars and tractors. University of Vermont herpetology lecturer James Andrews...
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FILE - This undated image provided by National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center shows a 5.5-inch long rare pocket shark. A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species, and one that squirts little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York have named it the American pocket shark, or Mollisquama (mah-lihs-KWAH-muh) mississippiensis (MISS-ih-SIP-ee-EHN-sis). (Mark Grace/National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center via AP, File)
July 19, 2019 - 5:41 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species. And the mysterious pouches that it's named for, up near its front fins? Scientists say they squirt little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York...
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In this undated handout photo provided by the Pelagos Cetacean Research Institute on Friday, June 21, 2019, researchers Alexandros Frantzis and Voula Alexiadou lie on a tennis court next to the plastic that was in the stomach of a dead sperm whale found on the Aegean Sea island of Mykonos. The collection includes a Greek souvlaki restaurant bag, Turkish trash bags and biscuit packaging. A study of whales and dolphins that have washed up dead in Greece over a 20-year period has found alarmingly high levels of plastic trash - mostly bags - in the animals' stomachs, which can condemn them to a slow and painful death. (Pelagos Cetacean Research Institute via AP)
June 21, 2019 - 10:20 am
ATHENS, Greece (AP) — A study of whales and dolphins that have washed up dead in Greece over a 20-year period has found alarmingly high levels of plastic trash — mostly bags — in the animals' stomachs, which can condemn them to a slow and painful death. In the worst case, a researcher said Friday,...
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In this undated image made from video provided by the University of St. Andrews, a seal copies the sounds of the song Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, in St Andrews, Scotland. Researchers at the University of St. Andrews say gray seals can copy the sounds of human words and songs including “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star.” The study showed that three trained seals were able to imitate parts of the lullaby and as well as other popular tunes. The research team released their findings on Thursday, June 20, 2019 including video footage of the seals. (University of St Andrews via AP)
June 21, 2019 - 9:43 am
LONDON (AP) — Researchers in Scotland say gray seals can copy the sounds of human words and songs including "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star." The study by University of St. Andrews researchers showed that three trained seals were able to imitate parts of popular tunes. The research team's findings...
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In this undated photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Mexican gray wolf interagency field team shows Mexican gray wolf pups that are part of a cross-fostering program in which pups born in captivity are placed with packs in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. (The Interagency Field Team/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
June 18, 2019 - 6:47 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — It's a carefully planned mission that involves coordination across state lines — from Mexican gray wolf dens hidden deep in the woods of New Mexico and Arizona to breeding facilities at zoos and special conservation centers around the U.S. It's also about timing as wolves...
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FILE - In this May 6, 2019 file photo, Duat Mai stands atop a dead whale at Ocean Beach in San Francisco. Federal officials are asking waterfront landowners in western Washington to volunteer their properties to be the final resting place for dead gray whales. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries says so many gray whale carcasses have washed up this year they've run out of locations where they can be left to decompose. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
June 16, 2019 - 2:03 am
PORT HADLOCK, Wash. (AP) — At least one Washington state waterfront landowner has said yes to a request to allow dead gray whales to decompose on their property. So many gray whale carcasses have washed up this year that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries says it has run...
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In this Thursday, May 23, 2019, photo, officials of the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources feed milk to Marium, a baby dugong separated from her mother, on Libong island, Trang province, southern Thailand. The estimated 5-month-old female dugong that has developed an attachment to humans after getting lost in the ocean off southern Thailand is being nurtured by marine experts in hopes that it can one day fend for itself. (Sirachai Arunrugstichai via AP)
June 14, 2019 - 7:42 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A baby dugong that has developed an attachment to humans after being separated from its mother and getting lost in the ocean off southern Thailand is being nurtured by marine experts in hopes that it can one day fend for itself. The estimated 5-month-old female dugong named Marium...
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